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AARHUS

Aarhus landmark to go dark during winter nights

Aarhus’ flagship art museum Aros is to switch off its rooftop rainbow installation at during due to the ongoing energy situation.

Aarhus landmark to go dark during winter nights
Aarhus museum Aros is to switch off its rooftop rainbow installation at night this winter. Photo by Steffen Muldbjerg on Unsplash

The Your Rainbow Panorama, designed by Danish-Icelandic artist Oliafur Eliasson, is one of the most recognisable sights in Aarhus and usually glows on the rooftop of the Aros museum during the darker months.

That will not be the case this winter with the museum deciding to cut the rainbow’s lights amid soaring energy costs for individuals and businesses, local media TV2 Østjylland reports.

“At Aros we want to contribute with everything we can with regard to the ongoing energy crisis and the general adaptations,” museum director Rebecca Matthews said in a statement, according to TV2 Østjylland.

“We have, as such, already implemented several measures and are now looking into addition ways of optimisation throughout the museum,” she said.

The rainbow, which is placed 3.5 metres above the museum’s roof, can be seen from much of the city centre. Visitors to the museum can walk around the inside of the rainbow, which has a circumference of around 150 metres.

The installation was scheduled to be switched off from midnight until 6am on Friday, breaking its regular night time illumination which began in 2011.

Aarhus has already confirmed a number of other energy-saving measures this winter. Christmas lighting will be cut back in November and December compared to recent years, while the outdoor skating rink usually operated by the city has been cancelled.

Department store Salling, which uses has one of the city’s most prominent Christmas light displays, has said it will not have Christmas lighting on its building this year.

The government earlier this month announced energy saving measures at public buildings and asked local authorities and businesses to take similar steps.

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NORD STREAM

Nord Stream 2 pipeline has stopped leaking gas under Baltic Sea: spokesman

The Nord Stream 2 pipeline is no longer leaking under the Baltic Sea because an equilibrium has been reached between the gas and water pressure, a spokesman told AFP.

Nord Stream 2 pipeline has stopped leaking gas under Baltic Sea: spokesman

“The water pressure has more or less closed the pipeline so that the gas which is inside can’t go out,” Nord Stream 2 spokesman Ulrich Lissek said.

“The conclusion is that there is still gas in the pipeline,” he added.

Asked how much gas was believed to be in the pipeline, Lissek said: “That is the one-million-dollar question.”

Information on the status of the Nord Stream 1 pipeline leak, which was significantly larger, was not immediately available.

The Nord Stream 1 and 2 pipelines, which connect Russia to Germany, have been at the centre of geopolitical tensions as Russia cut gas supplies to Europe in suspected retaliation against Western sanctions following Moscow’s
invasion of Ukraine.

While the pipelines are not currently in operation, they both still contained gas before they fell victim to apparent sabotage, producing four leaks.

Nord stream leak site

One of the Nord Stream leak sites photographed by the Swedish Coast Guard. A Danish-Swedish report said on Friday that the leaks were caused by blasts equal to “several hundred kilos of TNT”. Photo: Swedish Coast Guard.
Gas nearly exhausted

A Danish-Swedish report released on Friday concluded the leaks were caused by underwater explosions corresponding to hundreds of kilogrammes of explosives.

“All available information indicates that those explosions are the result of a deliberate act,” the countries said.

The source of the explosions has remained a mystery, however, with both Moscow and Washington denying responsibility.

All the leaks, which were discovered on Monday, are in the Baltic Sea off the Danish island of Bornholm.

Two of the leaks are located in the Swedish exclusive economic zone, and the two others in the Danish one.

Lissek said Nord Stream 2 had informed the Danish energy regulator earlier Saturday that the pipeline had stopped leaking gas.

Danish authorities had said the leaks would continue until the gas in the pipelines is exhausted, which is expected to occur on Sunday.

The Swedish coastguard said late Friday that the leaks on Nord Stream 2 showed signs of weakening due to the exhaustion of the gas contained in the pipes.

The diameter of the sea surface “boiling” caused by the leak in the Swedish exclusive economic zone was now only 20 metres (66 feet) wide, 10 times smaller than at the start.

The leak on Nord Stream 1 had also started to weaken on Friday, with surface diameter down to 600 metres in diameter, down from between 900 and 1,000 metres on Monday.

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