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Danish immigration ministry says Brexit deadline is ‘last chance’ for UK nationals

Michael Barrett
Michael Barrett - [email protected]
Danish immigration ministry says Brexit deadline is ‘last chance’ for UK nationals
Danish Minister of Immigration and Integration Kaare Dybvad Bek has warned remaining Britons eligible to apply for extended residency rights under the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement to do so by a final deadline of December 31st 2023. Photo: Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix

Eligible UK nationals yet to apply for continued right of residence in Denmark under the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement ‘need to remember’ to do so before an extended deadline in December, Immigration Minister Kaare Dybvad Bek has warned.

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British citizens who took up residence in Denmark before January 1st 2021 were required to apply to extend their right of residence under Denmark’s application of the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement.

Earlier this year, the government extended the deadline for applications to December 31st, 2023.

That decision was made after a significant number of people missed the original deadline, in part because many did not receive individual notification of the need to apply.

It should be noted Britons in Denmark who have already applied for and received a new residency document (in the form of an opholdstilladelse or residency permit ID card) since January 1st 2021, including those who applied prior to the original deadline, which was December 31st 2021, do not need to apply again.

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The December 31st deadline will be the “last chance” to apply for the residence document, the Danish Ministry of Immigration and Integration said in a statement issued on November 26th.

“Many British people live in Denmark as a natural part of our society. They greatly contribute to the labour market and to the Danish community. I hope they will continue to do that,” Bek said in the statement.

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“Therefore, I am satisfied that the deadline has been extended, so that persons who did not apply initially have been given a new chance. But you need to remember to apply. Therefore, I would like to encourage all the UK Nationals in Denmark to apply, so they can continue their lives in Denmark,” he said.

In the statement, British Ambassador to Denmark Emma Hopkins urged people “to check with British friends, neighbours, and colleagues and make sure they have applied by the end of the year if they have not done so already”.

“Time is of the essence, and if you are unsure, please contact the embassy or the Agency for International Recruitment and Integration (SIRI),” she added, referring to the agency responsible for issuing residence permits in Denmark.

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In an interview with The Local earlier this month, Hopkins said it would be “a matter for SIRI” if any UK nationals miss the deadline for application this time around.

“It's up to SIRI about how they process [late cases] if there are really strong extenuating reasons.

“But it's a matter for [SIRI], really, because that's within the gift of the Danish government. But what we can control is trying to get as many Brits to hear the message and to apply now.,” she said.

In the statement, the immigration ministry states that the “persons who have had their application processed and who have received a negative decision, because they did not live up to the requirements of the Withdrawal Agreement, will not have the opportunity to have their application processed again,” because this is not in accordance with the terms of the Withdrawal Agreement.

British citizens who took up residence in Denmark after December 31st 2020 are not covered by the Withdrawal Agreement and must therefore apply for residency under Denmark’s general rules for third party nationals.

More details about the application process and the application portal can be found on SIRI’s website.

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