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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Wednesday

The future of surrogate pregnancy in Denmark, whether women should be drafted, and sending Danish tanks to Ukraine are among the top news stories on Wednesday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Wednesday
Surrogacy could see a boost in Denmark following the recommendations of a government advisory board. (Photo: Ida Marie Odgaard/Ritzau Scanpix)

Advisory group recommends relaxing surrogacy restrictions 

The Danish Ethics Council, a government advisory body, officially recommends loosening restrictions on surrogate pregnancy, according to a press release. 

Currently, while it’s legal to be a surrogate mother in Denmark, it’s illegal to receive fertility treatment (such as artificial insemination). 

“Today, surrogacy cannot in practice take place in Denmark because the health professionals can’t help,” says Leif Vestergaard Pedersen, chairman of the Ethics Council. 

The Council also suggests that surrogacy itself should be considered part of fertility treatment for the prospective parents — and covered by the national health. 

READ MORE: Danish sperm banks want end to ban on home insemination

Unions: women in Denmark should also face military draft 

Three trade unions representing Denmark’s armed forces say conscription should apply to men and women equally, broadcaster DR reports

“As long as we only have conscription that includes men, women will be an afterthought. Someone who is not immediately considered as competent as men, and that is problematic,” Marie Sihm of the Association of Women Veterans told DR. 

Parties: Denmark could send ‘best tanks’ to Ukraine 

Party leaders tell DR they’re “open” to sending Leopard 2 tanks to Ukraine to aid in the war against Russia, if the Danish armed forces can spare them. 

Until now, Germany has blocked the donation of tanks to Ukraine due to concerns it could be seen as an escalation. That’s expected to end today, with Germany promising its own tanks for the war effort. 

Defense minister Jakob Ellemann-Jensen says Denmark has no “current plan” to donate tanks to Ukraine. 

READ MORE: Danish military sends tanks on foreign mission for first time since 2003 

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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday

A rare day of sunshine, a major fire in Copenhagen, and energy companies forced to 'give back' a billion kroner are among the top news stories in Denmark on Friday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday

Sunshine ahead 

Denmark can look forward to a rare day of winter sun on Friday, according to the latest from the Danish Meteorological Institute. 

DMI meteorologist Klaus Larsen says temperatures will hover above freezing and the wind will be manageable today as the clouds part. 

It will be a brief reprieve, however — the clouds will return promptly for the weekend. Take an hour to sit yourself outside like a potted plant. 

READ ALSO: Why Denmark’s extra grey January can cause winter blues, and what might help

Massive fire in west Copenhagen due to possible explosion 

A “major” fire on Damhus Boulevard took 21 vehicles and 49 firefighters to subdue, according to tweets from the Greater Copenhagen Fire Department. 

The fire broke out in an occupied building currently undergoing renovation, the Fire Department says. A news outlet that was on the scene while the fire was still active reports the emergency began with an explosion, which appears to be corroborated by images of the scene that show debris scattered well away from the building. 

Mads Dam of the Western Copenhagen police told news agency Ritzau that he couldn’t provide any information about the cause of the fire. “It all needs to cool down before our technicians can come in and examine it,” Dam said. 

Tax minister: energy companies owe Danes a billion kroner 

Energy companies will have to fork over 1.2 billion kroner of the last year’s windfall to the Danish treasury, tax minister Jeppe Bruus told business news outlet Finans. 

“We will return that money to consumers in the forthcoming negotiations on inflation relief,” Bruus said. He added that the 1.2 billion kroner sum is a fraction of what was expected to be recovered, which had been estimated at more than 10 billion. 

In September, European Commission announced plans to cap to energy company profits as well as levy collections from fossil energy companies to the tune of 140 billion euros, news agency Ritzau reports. 

READ ALSO: How much will energy cost in 2023 in Denmark compared to 2022?

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