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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Thursday

An agreement on a change to the pay limit scheme, Covid infection rates, and the latest on monkeypox are among the top headlines in Denmark this Thursday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Thursday
Tour de France riders rolled through Tivoli ahead of the team presentation. Photo: Bo Amstrup/Ritzau Scanpix

Parliament lowers salary required for pay limit scheme 

Yesterday evening, the Danish parliament agreed on a significant change to the pay limit scheme, which grants residence permits to foreign workers with job offers in Denmark above a yearly salary threshold. 

As of December 1st, salaries at or above 375,000 kroner will qualify for the scheme. (Based on today’s exchange rates, that’s the equivalent of $52,662, €50,394 and £43,355.)

It’s a 16 percent decrease from the current pay limit of 448,000, and the lowered threshold will exist on a trial basis for the next three years. 

The decision comes after months of political wrangling over the terms of the reduction. Supporters of the reform say the change is necessary to help alleviate soaring demand for labour in Denmark. 

Look out for a full report on this story on our website this morning.

READ ALSO: How can you get a work permit in Denmark if you are not an EU national? 

Serious illness stays low as Covid-19 case counts triple 

Since June 1st, positive PCR tests have nearly tripled in Denmark — and while hospital admissions for Covid patients have increased slightly, there hasn’t been a dramatic increase in serious illness from the virus, according to a press release from the National Board of Health. 

Health officials have kept a close eye on hospital admissions in light of BA.5., the new Omicron sub-variant that now accounts for the majority of cases in Denmark. Their analysis and studies in other countries suggest BA.5 does not cause more serious illness on a population level than previous variants. 

“We expect to look forward to a relatively calm summer, but we naturally keep an eye on whether there are changes in the infection situation,” Søren Brostrøm, director of the National Board of Health, told newswire Ritzau. 

Authorities earlier this week suggested the summer wave of infections is already waning.

What’s the status of monkeypox in Denmark? 

Two more cases of monkeypox were confirmed yesterday by the Ministry of Health, bringing the national tally to 18 since May 23rd. 

Officials have identified and vaccinated 22 close contacts to the known cases, the Ministry added. 

Since monkeypox can only be transmitted by touch when the characteristic rash with white blisters is already present, the risk to the population remains very low, scientists say. 

Thulesen Dahl leaves Danish People’s Party

Kristian Thulesen Dahl, former chairman and co-founder of the Danish People’s Party, has finally resigned after weeks of deliberation. His departure is the eleventh from the party in the past six months, leaving only five members in parliament. 

Thulesen Dahl says he will consider Inger Støjberg’s offer to join the Denmark Democrats, a new party currently gathering voter declarations to qualify for seats in parliament. 
READ ALSO: Danish People’s Party decimated by new high-profile departures 

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For members

TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Tuesday

The potential for a new Danish prime minister, more people on the 'poor payers' list, and the kickoff to Copenhagen Fashion Week are among the top news stories in Denmark this Tuesday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Tuesday

Frederiksen could call for election as early as next week 

A new opinion poll from Voxmeter by news agency Ritzau gives the Social Democrats, prime minister Mette Frederiksen’s party, their worst showing since 2015. 

Pressure is mounting for the Social Democrats to call for an election as the ‘blue bloc’ — anchored by the Liberal party (Venstre) and the Conservative People’s Party (De Konservative) — command 50 percent of the vote according to the latest poll. Meanwhile, the ‘red bloc’ holds just 47.5 percent. 

The Social Liberals (De Radikale), also of the red bloc, have demanded that Frederiksen hold elections by October at the latest. (Legally, the next general election can take place as late as June 4th, 2023.) 

Analysts say Frederiksen could call for an election as early as next week, when the Social Democrats convene for their summer group meeting. 

READ MORE: A foreigner’s guide to understanding Danish politics in five minutes

‘Hacker attacks’ keep 7-Eleven shuttered (with a few exceptions) 

The vast majority of Denmark’s 176 7-Eleven convenience stores remain hamstrung on Tuesday after what is believed to be a cyber attack on Monday. However, you’ll still be able to pick up GLS packages at ‘closed’ stores, and five capital-area stores can now accept purchases through MobilePay and cash. 

The reopened stores are at Rigshosital, Vesterbrogade, Lyngby Storcenter, and Gammel Kongevej in Copenhagen. Another at the Buddinge Station is Søborg is also back in action. 

READ MORE: Danish convenience stores closed by suspected cyber attack 

More ‘poor payers,’ but less average debt 

Denmark’s largest list of debtors — the RKI, or Riber’s credit information, run by Experian — has increased for the first time since 2014. 

The list is up a very modest 0.5 percent in the last six months, but Experian analysts expect that number to climb before the end of the year. 

“The whole world situation is a bit shaky at the moment,” says Experian director Bo Rasmussen. “War, inflation and rising prices everywhere have an effect on people’s private finances, so you don’t have the same leeway as you did one or two years ago.” 

Just under 172,000 Danes are registered on the RKI after being reported for not paying bills. Appearing on the registry can make it harder to rent an apartment, get a job, or even a mobile phone. 

On the upside, the average person on the RKI owes about 55,000 kroner in unpaid bills, down from about 65,000 kroner last year. 

READ MORE: Boligstøtte: Who can claim Denmark’s national rent subsidy? 

Copenhagen Fashion Week dawns 

Tuesday marks the beginning of Copenhagen Fashion Week, when buyers from all over the world gather to see Danish designers present their newest wares. 

Industry analysts aren’t bullish about the event’s prospects, though, according to broadcaster DR. After a record-breaking 45.1 billion kroner year for Danish fashion companies in 2021, the war in Ukraine and dwindling consumer confidence is likely to mean fewer sales and zero growth. 

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