SHARE
COPY LINK

HEALTH

The number of adults on ADHD medication in Denmark has almost doubled in six years

The number of people over the age of 18 in Denmark receiving medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has almost doubled from 2015 to 2021.

Prescription pills
ADHD is both genetic and hereditary. Photo by Christina Victoria Craft / Unsplash

In 2015, 26,000 people over the age of 18 received medication for ADHD, while in 2021, the figure increased to 51,000, the newspaper Politiken reports, based on figures it obtained from the Danish Health Data Authority.

Per Hove Thomsen, a professor of psychiatry at Aarhus University, says that all the adults who get diagnosed are born with ADHD and have thus lived with ADHD their whole lives without knowing it.

“But today, there is an increased focus on the fact that ADHD is not something you grow out of, and therefore more adults are becoming aware that it (note: ADHD) may be what makes it difficult for them to cope with everyday life,” he says.

Symptoms

ADHD symptoms for adults are, among others, difficulties in planning and completing tasks and large emotional fluctuations.

Especially in the past two years, the number of adults under medication has increased, and the increase is particularly large among 25 to 64-year-olds.

Two years ago, 19,000 people aged 25-44 were on ADHD medicine. The figure has now increased to over 26,000 people, which is an increase of approximately 40 percent. The increase is found among both men and women.

Despite the large increase in registered cases, there is still a notable number of unregistered cases. It is estimated that approximately 2.8 percent of the world’s adult population meets the requirements for a diagnosis of ADHD.

If that is the case, around 135,000 adults in Denmark meet the criteria for the diagnosis. Attention deficit disorders put you at great risk of developing other mental disorders, such as anxiety and depression.

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

HEALTH

Danish public sector workers offered full time contracts

People who work in the public sector for Danske Regioner, the regional authorities which are responsible for health services, will be given the automatic right to become contracted as full time employees.

Danish public sector workers offered full time contracts

The objective of the decision is to secure staff at hospitals and social services which are operated by regional authorities, Danske Regioner said in a statement on Tuesday.

The Regions’ elected official in charge of the salary and practice committee, Region Zealand council chairperson Heino Knudsen, said it was “crucial” for regional authorities to increase the working hours of staff by moving more people from part-time to full-time terms.

“We need staff in the health services and we need all the staff we can get. Preferably a lot more who are working full time,” Knudsen said.

“Currently, we can see that an overall 32 percent of people employed by Regions are part-time. We very much want to reduce that percentage so that more people want to work full time and have the option of doing so,” he said.

Social care sector staff have had the right to automatically become full-time since 2020, but the option was not previously extended to all employees.

READ ALSO: What’s the difference between a municipality and a region in Denmark?

SHOW COMMENTS