SHARE
COPY LINK
For members

TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Thursday

Skyrocketing wait times for psychiatrists, splitting monkeypox vaccine doses, and the 7-Eleven ransom are among the top news stories in Denmark on Thursday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Thursday
A donor conference to support Ukraine will be held at Christiansborg in Copenhagen on Thursday. Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelenskyy will give opening remarks via video call. (Photo: Philip Davali/Ritzau Scanpix)

It takes a year to see a psychiatrist in Denmark 

New data from sundhed.dk analysed by broadcaster DR show an average wait time of 63 weeks to get in with a psychiatrist. 

Wait times for mental health care have climbed dramatically over the last several years. In 2018, the average wait to see a psychiatrist was 23.6 weeks, DR reports, while in 2021, the wait was 37.4 weeks. That’s a 68 percent leap from 2021 to 2022. 

Regional differences in wait times are dramatic — in North Jutland, patients wait an average of 84 weeks. 

Minister of health Magnus Heunicke has refused to sit for an interview with DR on the status of a 10-year plan to improve access to mental healthcare. 

READ MORE: Depressed in Denmark: How to find a therapist in the ‘world’s happiest country’ 

Danish officers will train Ukrainian forces in UK 

Within the next six months, 130 Danish instructors will arrive in the United Kingdom to train Ukrainian soldiers who have “no or limited military experience,” according to newswire Ritzau. 

“We have undertaken to train up to 10,000 Ukrainian soldiers in Great Britain, and I am pleased that Denmark will participate in that project,” Ben Wallace, the British minister of defense, said at a press conference in Copenhagen Wednesday afternoon. 

Danish minister of defense Morten Bødskov says the country has also extended an offer to train Ukrainian soldiers in Denmark — for example, in de-mining. 

Russia’s ambassador to Denmark, Vladimir Barbin, sees the assistance to Ukraine as “delaying peace,” he wrote in an email to broadcaster TV2. 

Danish drugmaker objects to plan to split monkeypox doses 

Bavarian Nordic, the company behind the monkeypox vaccine, has spoken out against the US Food and Drug Administration’s plan to split single doses of the drug into five smaller doses under certain circumstances, according to reporting by the Washington Post. 

The FDA signed off on the plan on Tuesday in an effort to extend a limited supply of doses to a greater population. 

The US isn’t the first country to attempt to get creative with the dosing of the vaccine. According to Bavarian’s instructions, the monkeypox vaccine should be administered over two shots separated by at least 28 days, but the UK has begun offering only a single shot. 

If countries decide to give one shot now, they have a long time to offer the booster and still achieve the same durability advantage. There is plenty of data to support one shot,” Paul Chaplin, managing director of Bavarian Nordic, told news outlet Science in July. 

READ MORE: Danish LGBTQ+ group welcomes monkeypox vaccination decision 

7-Eleven mostly back on grid after ransomware attack

About 169 of 7-Eleven’s 176 Denmark locations are back up and running, according to a statement from the convenience store company on Wednesday evening. 

However, convenience stores at train stations (where you can buy a transport card) only accept Dankort at the moment. All operational stores outside of train stations currently accept Mobile Pay and cash, and many can take Visa, Mastercard, and Dankort. 

7-Eleven has also confirmed that the outage was due to a ransomware attack — hackers demanded money to return access to the company’s data and systems. 

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.
For members

TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Thursday

Shorter Master's' degrees, sanctions against Russia, and deficiencies in the Danish Armed Forces are among the top news stories in Denmark on Thursday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Thursday

Denmark plans to shorten Master’s degrees to save money 

Next week, the government will present a plan to cut costs for some Master’s degree programmes by lopping off the second and final year, newspaper Politiken reports. But both labour unions and industry representatives worry it risks turning out under-prepared graduates. 

The changes would affect half of all master’s students in Denmark, according to Politiken, and 70 percent of students in humanities and social sciences.The intent is to funnel the savings into “medium-term professional courses” including nursing, teaching, and social work.

“We are very concerned that university education will be degraded,” says Sara Vergo, chairman of the trade union Djøf, which represents students and workers in “social sciences, business and law.”  

READ MORE: How to save money as a student in Denmark

Denmark pushes for more sanctions against Russia 

Foreign minister Jeppe Kofod says he and his EU counterparts from other countries have agreed to further ramp up sanctions against Russia for its invasion of Ukraine. 

Likely targets are tightening restrictions against Russian oligarchs and imposing sanctions on Russian exports that are vital to the economy and military industry, Kofod tells newswire Ritzau. 

“These are sanctions that hit Putin’s regime and the people around him,” he added. 

The European Commission’s foreign affairs chief told Reuters that the new sanctions will be designed to target “more relevant sectors of the Russian economy and continue to target individuals responsible for the war of aggression against Ukraine.” 

The EU’s foreign ministers will convene again in mid-October to finalise the new sanctions package. 

READ MORE: 10 ways EU countries aim to cut energy bills and avoid blackouts this winter 

Tire-kicking reveals deficiencies in Danish Armed Forces 

On Wednesday, defence minister Morten Bødskov outlined the results of an investigation into the facilities and equipment of the Danish Armed Forces — and both have been found lacking. 

“We need billions of investment just to continue the current defence,” Bødskov said at a press conference. 

A correspondent for broadcaster DR wrote that the audit confirms what many in defence have reported for years — mouldy barracks and “hopelessly old IT equipment.” 

SHOW COMMENTS