Denmark recommends Covid-19 booster jabs to all adults

Denmark confirmed November 25th it will offer a Covid-19 booster vaccination to all adults over 18.
Denmark confirmed November 25th it will offer a Covid-19 booster vaccination to all adults over 18. File photo: Claus Fisker/Ritzau Scanpix
Everyone over the age of 18 in Denmark will be offered a booster vaccination against Covid-19.

The recommendation is an update to the earlier policy in which primarily vulnerable and elderly groups were offered the booster or ‘third’ coronavirus jab.

Invitations for revaccination will be offered to all people over 18 who have previously been fully vaccinated with two doses of a Covid-19 vaccine, or one in the case of the single-dose jab from Johnson & Johnson.

The booster will be offered six months after the date of the final dose of the original vaccination and will take the form of an invitation sent to Denmark residents’ secure digital mail, via the borger.dk or eBoks.dk platforms. This mirrors the procedure for the original vaccination programme.

“The Danish Health Authority recommends that the principle of revaccination six months after completed vaccination is extended so all adults over 18 are offered a third jab against Covid-19,” the health authority said in a statement.

Some 650,000 people in Denmark have so far received a booster against the coronavirus, around 11.2 percent of the overall population.

The Ministry of Health earlier said it aims to increase vaccination capacity regionally and expects to be close to its target of 300,000 vaccinations weekly from next week.

Revaccination of over 65s is considered by the Danish Health Authority to have “no risk of new serious side effects with a third dose”, the authority said last month.

Younger people may experience stronger reactions including “pain at the injection point, mild fever, discomfort and headache,” the authority also said.

“We can see that the possible side effects of a third jab are largely the same as with the second jab,” Danish Health Authority deputy director Helene Probst said in Thursday’s statement.

“This also means that we will see rare cases of myocarditis — inflammation of the heart — when we revaccinate younger cohorts, especially young men, just as we have seen some cases of this after another the second dose,” Probst said.

“But there are very few cases, typically with mild outcomes and with good treatment options,” she added.

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