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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Tuesday

Find out what's going on in Denmark today with The Local's short roundup of the news in less than five minutes.

An illustration photo of an iPad. Rival parties want Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen to hand over her devices to police so that deleted texts related to the country's mink scandal can be retrieved.
An illustration photo of an iPad. Rival parties want Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen to hand over her devices to police so that deleted texts related to the country's mink scandal can be retrieved. Photo by Henry Ascroft on Unsplash

Covid-19 rapid test centres open in several cities 

Last week’s announcement that rapid Covid-19 testing facilities will be reopened becomes effective in several cities today as private contractor Falck opens test centres in Aarhus, Herning, Horsens and Ringsted.

The decision to bring back rapid testing with a capacity of up to 100,000 tests per day was made in response to increasing daily Covid-19 infection numbers in Denmark in late October.

Further centres in Roskilde, Køge, Frederikshavn, Thisted, Hobro, Viborg, Randers, Holstebro and Silkeborg are scheduled to open this week.

Parties want PM Frederiksen to hand over computer and iPad to police

The opposition Liberal party as well as parliamentary allies the Social Liberals (Radikale Venstre) want Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen to hand over her computer and iPad to the police, according to newspaper Politiken.

Frederiksen is under increasing pressure over deleted SMS messages related to last year’s decision to cull all of Denmark’s fur farm mink, and rival politicians say all of the PM’s devices – not just her phone – should be handed over to give police the best chance to retrieve the messages.

“Police should have exactly the tools that are needed to retrieve the SMS messages,” Social Liberal justice spokesperson Samira Nawa said to Politiken.

READ ALSO: Danish prime minister promises ‘answers’ over deleted mink texts

Maersk profits up as global supply chain disrupted

Danish shipping giant, AP Moeller-Maersk, says its profits were up sixfold in the third quarter as the coronavirus pandemic and global supply chain problems caused container prices to soar. 

“Maersk delivered record earnings” in the third quarter, chief executive Søren Skou said according to news wire AFP.

“Results in Q3 were driven by high freight rates in an exceptional market situation,” the group said.

Tuesday to stay dry in most areas

Dry weather is forecast in most of Denmark today with some parts seeing glimpses of the sun.

West Jutland and the island of Bornholm are the most likely regions to see rain, with up to 12 millimetres forecast in the latter.

A southerly wind is expected and temperatures will be around 9-11 degrees Celsius.

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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Tuesday

Possible blackouts in Denmark this winter, a significant gas leak off Bornholm, and the health minister's answer to concerns about Covid vaccine underdosing are among the top news stories in Denmark on Tuesday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Tuesday

Electricity blackouts possible in Denmark this winter 

The Danish Energy Agency sees an increased risk that private customers will have their power temporarily cut off — depending on the weather. 

“If we now hit a very hard, cold winter, and the wind is calm at the same time, so we don’t have energy from the wind turbines, then we will be in a place where we have a stressed energy system,” agency director Kristoffer Böttzauw told broadcaster DR. 

However, current weather forecasts suggest the situation isn’t likely to be that dire. Brian Vad Mathiesen, professor of energy planning at Aalborg University, told DR that he considers such shutoffs unlikely. 

The authorities can usually tell about a day in advance if demand is likely to exceed supply, giving them time to make large consumers — on industrial scales — cut down, Ritzau reports. 

But if authorities aren’t successful, there could be blackouts for private customers. They would last two hours at a time for specific areas across the country, and customers aren’t notified in advance. 

READ MORE: Danish heating company asks customers not to turn on heating

Gas leak in Russian pipe off coast of Denmark 

Nord Stream 2, an underwater pipeline created to run gas from Russia to Germany that was shut down before becoming operational, appears to have sprung a leak after an unexplained pressure drop within the pipe. 

Authorities have spotted a “large bubble field near Bornholm”, a Danish island in the Baltic, Nord Stream 2 spokesman Ulrich Lissek told the Agence France-Presse.

Preliminary assessments suggest environmental damage in the area of the leak. 

On Tuesday morning, the Swedish Maritime Administration reported that two additional leaks have been found on sister pipeline Nord Stream 1 — one in Danish waters and another in Swedish territory, but both northeast of Bornholm. 

READ MORE: Germany and Denmark investigate Russian pipeline pressure drop 

Health minister to address Covid vaccine underdosing 

Magnus Heunicke, the Danish minister of health, has convened Parliament’s health rapporteurs to discuss the possibility that millions of people vaccinated for Covid in Denmark received too low a dose. 

An investigation by DR, partnering with the Danish Technological Institute, suggests that instructions provided by Danish health authorities in the hopes of stretching the limited supply of vaccines led to 10 percent underdoses of Pfizer-BioNTech shots. 

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