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MAP: What you need to know about the 2022 Tour de France (and Denmark)

The 2022 Tour de France starts on Friday and is once more an international event - setting off from Copenhagen - after the previous two years' events were curtailed by the pandemic.

The 2022 Tour de France will start in Denmark
The 2022 Tour de France will start in Denmark. Photo: Anne-Christine Poujoulat/AFP

The race will begin in Copenhagen and spend several days in Denmark crossing islands before riders will be transferred back to France for the race to continue from the north east of the country.

The French portion of the route begins in Dunkirk and then travels down the eastern side of the country, taking in the Alps before looping across southern France to the Pyrenees for more mountain racing.

It will finish as usual in Paris, with riders cycling up the Champs-Elysées on Sunday, July 24th.

The Tour usually includes at least one stage outside France, but Covid travel restrictions meant the 2021 race was held entirely in France, apart from a brief trip into the neighbouring micro-state of Andorra.

Copenhagen was originally scheduled to host the 2021 Grand Départ.

The race usually starts on a Saturday, but next year will begin on Friday, July 1st, in order to allow time for the rest days and transfer of all teams back from Denmark to France.

The full route is;

 Stage 1 – July 1st
   Copenhagen – Copenhagen – 13km (time trial)

   Stage 2 – July 2nd
   Roskilde – Nyborg – 199km

   Stage 3 – July 3rd
   Vejle – Sonderborg – 182km

   Stage 4 – July 5th
   Dunkirk – Calais – 172km

   Stage 5 – July 6th
   Lille – Arenberg Porte du Hainaut – 155km

   Stage 6 – July 7th
   Binche (Belgium) – Longwy – 220km

   Stage 7 – July 8th
   Tomblaine – La Super Planche des Belles Filles – 176km

   Stage 8 – July 9th
   Dole – Lausanne (Switzerland) – 184km

   Stage 9 – July 10th
   Aigle (Switzerland) – Chatel – 183km

   Stage 10 – July 11th
   Morzine – Megeve – 148km

   Rest day – July 12th

   Stage 11 – July 13th
   Albertville – Col du Granon – 149km

   Stage 12 – July 14th
   Briancon – Alpe d’Huez – 166km

   Stage 13 – July 15th
   Bourg d’Oisans – Saint-Etienne – 193km

   Stage 14 – July 16th
   Saint Etienne – Mende – 195km

   Stage 15 – July 17th
   Rodez – Carcassonne – 200km

   Rest Day – July 18th

   Stage 16 – July 19th
   Carcassonne – Foix – 179km

   Stage 17 – July 20th
   Saint-Gaudens – Peyragudes – 130km

   Stage 18 – July 21st
   Lourdes – Huatacam – 143km

   Stage 19 – July 22nd
   Castelnau-Magnoac – Cahors – 189km

   Stage 20 – July 23rd
   Lacapelle-Marival – Rocamadour – 40km (time trial)

   Stage 21 – July 24th
   Paris – Paris – 112km

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RACISM

Danish broadcaster apologises for ‘unintended racism’ in segment on Moroccan football team

Danish broadcaster TV2 has issued an apology in Danish and English after a segment in which its presenters appeared to compare Moroccan footballers and their families with monkeys.

Danish broadcaster apologises for ‘unintended racism' in segment on Moroccan football team

Denmark’s broadcaster TV2 has apologised for a segment which it said made an “unintentional” comparison between Morocco’s footballers and a family of monkeys, in a clip that has now been reported by international media in the Middle East.

In a segment on the programme News & Co. about Morocco’s footballers celebrating with their mothers after World Cup matches, TV2 presenters appeared to compare them with a photograph of monkeys which was the subject of the following segment.

While one presenter, Søren Lippert, holds a photo of a family of monkeys, co-presenter Christian Høgh Andersen says “this is in extension of Morocco gathering their families in Qatar”.

“We have an animal family gathered here, maybe to stay warm,” he continues as the camera pans onto the photo.

Asked by another voice out of picture why he’s making a connection between the two, Andersen says “because they’re sticking together, and that’s also what they’re doing with the family reunification in Morocco”. He uses the Danish legal term for family reunification, fammiliesammenføring.

Both Lippert and Andersen responded after the clip was spread on social media with an English translation added.

Lippert, who was holding the picture but didn’t make the remarks, said that “however unintentional, the comparison made in the program is not ok”.

In a longer statement posted on Facebook, Andersen said he wanted to give an “unreserved apology” for the comments.

“In a poor attempt at humour I drew a line between sticking together as a family when the next topic about animals was presented in the studio,” he wrote.

“Unintentionally it became a comparison between Morocco’s national football team and the family of monkeys which my co-host Søren Lippert was holding a picture of and which we were using for the next segment,” he wrote.

“I am very sorry and I want to give an unreserved apology for this,” he wrote.

The broadcaster published an apology in Danish and English on its website, saying that the section “can be perceived as a racist comment, and both TV2 and Christian Høgh Andersen would like to give a profound apology for that.”

“We deeply apologize that a host on TV2 News made a comment that is both wrong and offensive. Although it was not the intention of the host, it is a remark that both our host and TV2 dissociate from. This was a clear mistake, we apologize for it, and we will take it into account in our work at TV2 News,” the broadcaster’s editor-in-chief Anne Mette Svane said in the statement.

“TV2 has apologized to the viewers who have contacted TV2, and also believes it is necessary to dissociate from the inappropriate comment publicly,” the statement adds.

The broadcaster has also apologised on social media in response to international media reporting on the clip, including by Qatar-based media al-Jazeera.

The incident was not the only time the broadcaster came under pressure for inappropriate comments during the World Cup.

In November, commentator Thomas Kristensen was criticised for comparing Belgium striker Romelu Lukaku with King Kong during live commentary. Kristensen defended the remark by saying he meant to compare Lukaku with “a monster who everyone is scared of, and nothing else”.

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