Advertisement

Danish Covid-19 treatment approved for human trials

Author thumbnail
Ritzau/The Local - [email protected]
Danish Covid-19 treatment approved for human trials
(ARKIV) Rigshospitalet. Overlægeforeningen ærgrer sig, men er ikke overrasket over, at ny opdatering af omstridt it-system udskydes. Det skriver Ritzau, tirsdag den 7. august 2018.. (Foto: Anne Bæk/Ritzau Scanpix)

Clinical trials could be on the horizon for a new treatment against Covid-19, developed by researchers in Denmark.

Advertisement

The potential new medicine is in the form of a solution which must be inhaled after contraction of Covid-19 and fights respiratory infections. Upcoming trials on healthy human subjects were confirmed by Copenhagen’s Rigshospitalet in a statement.

“Although several vaccine options are now in use against Covid-19, there’s still a need for new and different treatment methods which are particularly aimed at patients who are hospitalised with Covid-19,” said Thomas Bjarnshold, professor at the Department of Clinical Microbiology at Rigshospitalet and the Department of Immunology and Microbiology and the University of Copenhagen.

The treatment could potentially also be used against other conditions including pneumonia, influenza and tuberculosis.

Norwegian company SoftOx is a partner in the development of the treatment.

Advertisement

It would normally be administered to people shortly after they have been exposed to the coronavirus, Bjansholt said.

“When you have been exposed, have just tested positive and have begun to get symptoms, our treatment will be able to deactivate virus and help the immune system to prevent hospitalisation and serious symptoms,” he said.

The researcher added the treatment could be an option in countries with low vaccine coverage.

The newly-approved testing phase on healthy humans is expected to be completed at the beginning of next year, Bjarnsholt said.

“If there are no side effects (on triallists) we will a begin phase 2 study on Covid patients soon after,” he said.

“This is something we’ve worked on for a long time. So it’s fantastic we can now test it on people,” he added.

More

Comments

Join the conversation in our comments section below. Share your own views and experience and if you have a question or suggestion for our journalists then email us at [email protected].
Please keep comments civil, constructive and on topic – and make sure to read our terms of use before getting involved.

Please log in to leave a comment.

See Also