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READER QUESTIONS

Reader question: If Britons are already resident in one EU country, can they move to another?

As British nationals face new rules on moving to EU and Schengen countries, readers are asking if already having residency in one EU member state allows them to move freely to another.

Reader question: If Britons are already resident in one EU country, can they move to another?
If you already call a European country home, how are your rights affected after Brexit? Photo: AFP
Question: I now have residency status in Italy, but I was wondering, does that allow me free movement within Europe or am I still bound by the conditions for all UK citizens?

This question is one of several similar queries The Local has received recently, as British nationals get to grips with new restrictions on travel and life in Europe.

EU membership and freedom of movement had previously allowed Britons to move abroad to live, work, and retire without the need for visas.

This had also allowed British nationals to then move freely from one EU member state to another.

But that is no longer the case, after British PM Boris Johnson and his government decided to end freedom of movement, including onward from one EU country to another.

Simply put, this means a British national wanting to move from one EU country to another would now need to apply for a long-stay or residency visa – in exactly the same way as if they were moving from the UK to the EU for the first time.

This is because rules are based on your citizenship, rather than on the country you have residency in.

So moving from one EU country to another, while still possible, is now more complicated.

READER QUESTION: Can Brits stay more than 90 days in the EU if they have a spouse with an EU passport?

For example, a British citizen now resident in France would not be able to move to Germany without going through the process for visas, because the freedom they used to leave the UK in the first place has ended.

Each EU country will have its own requirements for new residents. Italy, for example, has from January 1st 2021 introduced a new long-stay visa for British nationals hoping to move to the country.

No visa will be needed to stay in the EU or the wider Schengen zone for under 90 days in every 180 day period, but anyone planning a longer stay, or to do paid work, will have to apply for one.

Member comments

  1. Why would you want to leave Asti? For those who live elsewhere, the church is San Secondo, where (in normal times) I sing in one of the choirs.

  2. If a Brit has residency in France, for example, does that mean the 90 day limit for visiting other EU countries has already been used up ?

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IMMIGRATION

Half of all immigrants to Denmark in 2021 moved for work reasons

A new report from Statistics Denmark shows that 48 percent of residence permits granted to foreign nationals in Denmark in 2021 were for employment reasons. Asylum seekers accounted for 1 percent of new residents.

Half of all immigrants to Denmark in 2021 moved for work reasons

Since the beginning of the century, the reasons for which foreign nationals are granted residency in Denmark have changed considerably, according to a new report by national agency Statistics Denmark.

Over 48 percent of foreign nationals who moved to Denmark with a residence permit in 2021 did so for the purpose of working in the country.

That is the highest level in the last 20 years.

“During the last 20 years there has been a steep increase of immigration of persons who do not have Danish or Nordic citizenship, only briefly interrupted in 2020 because of Covid-19,” Statistics Denmark senior consultant Jørn Korsbø Petersen said in a press statement.

“But the reason for the immigrants’ residence has changed a lot during this period and last year almost half came to Denmark due to work,” Petersen said.

Data from back in 1997 show that during that year, half of the 21,264 people who were issued residency in Denmark arrived for asylum or family reunification reasons, with 32 percent moving for work or study.

In 2021, those proportions had shifted with 70 percent of the total 52,736 arrivals for reasons of either work or study.

Just 1 percent of residence permits were given for asylum with 5 percent granted family reunification.

The primary reason for that change is the increase in people moving to Denmark from other EU countries, according to Statistics Denmark.

Since 1997, a number of new countries including Poland, Latvia, Lithuania, Bulgaria and Romania have joined the EU, with immigration from these countries to Denmark for work reasons subsequently increasing.

Nationals of EU countries can freely move to Denmark to work under the right to free movement guaranteed by EU membership. Citizens of other countries do not have the same rights and must fulfil stringent criteria to be granted residency in the Nordic country.

READ ALSO: How can you get a work permit in Denmark if you are not an EU national?

That is reflected by the data, Statistics Denmark notes. Of the 25,500 persons who immigrated to Denmark for work reasons in 2021, 19,500 were EU or EEA citizens.

The numbers show that the demand for labour in Denmark is “almost insatiable” in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, according to Tore Stramer, the senior economist with the Danish Chamber of Commerce (Dansk Erhverv).

“Foreign labour has been a very important lifeline for Danish businesses at this conjuncture,” he said.

“If businesses had not been able to recruit foreign labour, the economic recovery after the corona crisis would have been significantly harder,” he said in a written comment.

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