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Apple to fund biogas research in Denmark

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Apple to fund biogas research in Denmark
Apple's sales director for northern Europe, Erik Stannow, presented plans and models for Apple's new data centre in Foulum on Friday. Photo: Henning Bagger/Scanpix
13:12 CEST+02:00
The Danish Foreign Ministry on Friday announced that Apple will "fund and boost" biogas research at Aarhus University.
The California tech behemoth will provide funding for the university research into how to covert biogas into electricity via the use of fuel cells. The university will use agricultural waste including straw and manure provided by local formers. 
 
A Foreign Ministry spokesperson told The Local that Apple has committed to an initial 20 million kroner ($3 million, €2.7 million) grant to the university, but declined to divulge the total figure that the tech company has pledged to the multi-year agreement. 
 
The announcement comes as Apple's sales director for northern Europe, Erik Stannow, presented plans and models for Apple's new data centre in Foulum, a small village outside of Viborg that is home to Aarhus University’s agricultural research facilities. 
 
The construction of Apple's new massive data centre is already underway. Photo: Henning Bagger/Scanpix
The construction of Apple's new massive data centre is already underway. Photo: Henning Bagger/Scanpix
 
Foreign Minister Kristian Jensen said the new collaboration is “an excellent follow-on to Apple’s billion investment in the data centre”.
 
“The new partnership is a good example that [ministry investment organization] Invest in Denmark’s targeted efforts to attract data centre investments to Denmark is producing excellent results. It also illustrates that data centre investors often wish to contribute to research into and the expansion of the renewable energy capacity in Denmark to the benefit of everyone,” Jensen said in a statement. 
 
Apple’s data centre outside of Viborg will run on 100 percent renewable energy and will power the company’s online services like the iTunes Store, App Store, iMessage and Siri. 
 
The foreign ministry said it represents the largest ever “green” investment in Denmark. The data centre will measure 166,000 square metres and is expected to begin operations in 2017.  
 
 
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