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'Breakthrough' in Dane's gruesome genitalia case

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'Breakthrough' in Dane's gruesome genitalia case
The macabre case is playing out in Bloemfontein. Photo: South African Tourism/Flickr
08:28 CEST+02:00
South African police say there has has been a breakthrough in the case of the Danish man accused of cutting off women's sexual organs and storing them in his freezer.
Police in South Africa have now identified several of a 63-year-old Danish man's female victims, investigators have told Ekstra Bladet
 
Officials in the South African town of Bloemfontein recently identified two additional women, both in their 20s. A seven-year-old girl is also among the victims, and investigators also believe that some of the genitals found in the man's freezer come from Danish women. 
 
“We are following several tracks in the case but this is a preliminary breakthrough,” investigator Lynda Steyn told Ekstra Bladet. 
 
 
The 63-year-old man, who has been identified in the Danish press as Peter Frederiksen, was arrested in mid-September after one of his alleged victims, reportedly his own wife, led police to the man's home. 
 
There they made the gruesome discovery of 21 pieces of female genitalia that were stored in a freezer. 
 
The suspect has been held in police custody for nearly a month and will appear before a judge again on November 4th. His lawyers will appeal to the court to release the man on bail, something the court has previously denied. 
 
The man in question had previously voluntarily participated in a radio documentary for Danish public broadcaster DR in which he openly detailed performing genital mutilation on his African wife and her friends. 
 
He reportedly fled from Denmark to South Africa to avoid weapons charges and opened a gun shop in the city of Bloemfontein. 
 
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