Editions:  Austria · Denmark · France · Germany · Italy · Norway · Spain · Sweden · Switzerland
Advertisement

Danes take 'tryvertising' idea to New York

Share this article

Danes take 'tryvertising' idea to New York
TrySome CEO Rune F. Knudsen. Photo: TrySome
08:35 CEST+02:00
The founders behind Freemarket now aim to export the 'free marketplace' concept they initially pioneered in Denmark across the Atlantic to Brooklyn, New York.

The people behind the Danish company Testr – formerly known as Freemarket – are now hoping to export a new idea based on the same concept of ‘tryvertising' to New York.

Testr was originally launched as Freemarket in the Frederiksberg district of Copenhagen, the idea behind it being to allow registered customers to claim up to ten free products per month in exchange for reviewing them online via social media or a customer survey, and a small monthly subscription fee.

See also: Denmark gets its first 'free' supermarket

Now, the founders are hoping to launch their next innovative business idea called TrySome.

Essentially, consumers would be given the option to choose a range of organic food and beauty products they would be interested in trying for free in exchange for supplying reviews. These reviews are also passed on straight to the producers, providing them with valuable information about how to improve their products.

“TrySome aims to help consumers and manufacturers of organic, non-GMO, FairTrade and non-conventional products gain momentum by lowering economic barriers for shoppers to try these products. The price of responsibly made products forces over 50% of the US population to buy undesirable products that don't match their values,” TrySome's CEO Rune Knudsen explained in a press release.

After registering on the website, they will be given a limited monthly supply of so-called ‘credits' to choose which organic products they would like to sample. According to TrySome, the credit limitation will force the participants to only pick the products they are most interested in, thereby reflecting real world spending limitations.

"We hope that by influencing purchasing habits towards more responsibly made products, we will benefit the environment and drive positive change for ethical production, because we need a revolution within the consumer packaged goods industry” Knudsen added.

The company has recently started a crowdfunding campaign, in order to obtain the necessary funding to make the idea a reality.

 

Get notified about breaking news on The Local

Share this article

Advertisement

From our sponsors

The Swedish university tackling the challenges of tomorrow

Ranked among the world's best young universities in the QS Top 50 Under 50, Linköping University (LiU) uses innovative learning techniques that prepare its students to tackle the challenges of tomorrow.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Jobs
Click here to start your job search
Advertisement
Advertisement

Popular articles

Advertisement
Advertisement