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Danish women earn 16.4 percent less than men

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Danish women earn 16.4 percent less than men
One of these people earns significantly more than the other two. Photo: Colourbox
14:15 CET+01:00
In advance of International Women's Day, Eurostat has released figures that show that women throughout Europe still earn significantly less than men.
Statistics from the European Union statistical office (Eurostat) showed on Thursday that women working in Denmark earned 16.4 percent less per hour than men in 2013, only a small improvement over the gender pay gap in 2008.
 
The Danish gender gap is right at the EU average, but significantly lower than member states like Slovenia (3.2%), Malta (5.1%), Italy (7.3%) and Croatia (7.4%).
 
Denmark has the biggest gender wage gap of the three Scandinavian countries, bested by both Sweden (15.2%) and Norway (16.0%). Nordic countries Finland and Iceland had bigger gaps, at 18.7 and 20.5 percent, respectively.

While the gap shrank in most EU countries, there were increases in nine member states, with Eurostat pointing out particularly large increases in Portugal, Spain, Latvia, Italy and Estonia.

The statisticians also looked into full- and part-time work among women, finding that states where women could work part-time had higher overall female employment rates.

This was true of Denmark, but also Sweden, Germany, the Netherlands and Austria.

Exceptions to the trend were Finland and Estonia, where much larger numbers of women were working full-time.
 
But women were much less likely than men to be employed as managers across Europe.
 
In Denmark, just 28 percent of managers are women compared with 48 percent of the total workforce.
 
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