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EUROPEAN UNION

Danes benefit the most from EU: think-tank

Integrating economically with its neighbours helped incomes in Denmark grow more than in any other country.

Danes benefit the most from EU: think-tank
Photo: Colourbox
Denmark and Germany came out as the winners of the European Union's single market in a study released on Monday. 
 
For every year between 1992 and 2012, Danes’ average annual incomes were €500 (3,730 kroner) higher than they would have been without the single market, a study by the German think-tank Bertelsmann Foundation found. The income increase was the highest of the 15 countries that joined the single market in the 1990s. 
 
That means in 2012, GDP per person was 2.0 percent higher than it would have been without integration – the second highest figure of the EU countries. 
 
Only Germany’s 2.3 percent increase was better, but the Danes’ average €500 per capita income gain was higher than the Germans’ €450 increase. 
 
The single market guarantees free movement of goods, persons and services, as well as of capital and payment transactions across national borders.
 
The study found that economic integration increased in almost all of the 15 states that joined the European single market in the 1990s, resulting in income gains in every national economy.
 
Only Luxembourg was not assessed because of "major data gaps".

Greece was the only country with a mixed picture of the benefits brought by the EU, the study said.

Taken alone, Greeks' annual incomes rose by an average of just €70 each year over the 20-year period.
 
Yet in real terms, incomes were found to have fallen by €190 in this time due to the nation's dramatic economic crisis.
 
The United Kingdom has also failed to take as much advantage of the single market as it could have. Incomes in the UK rose an average of just €10 a year thanks to the single market. 

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SAS

‘We agree to disagree’: Still no progress in marathon SAS strike talks

By lunchtime on Friday, talks between the Scandinavian airline SAS and unions representing striking pilots were still stuck on "difficult issues".

'We agree to disagree': Still no progress in marathon SAS strike talks

“We agree that we disagree,” Roger Klokset, from the Norwegian pilots’ union, said at lunchtime outside the headquarters of the Confederation of Swedish Enterprise in Stockholm, where talks are taking place. “We are still working to find a solution, and so long as there is still some point in continuing negotiations, we will do that.” 

Mats Ruland, a mediator for the Norwegian government, said that there were “still several difficult issues which need to be solved”. 

At 1pm on Friday, the two sides took a short break from the talks for lunch, after starting at 9am. On Thursday, they negotiated for 15 hours, breaking off at 1am on Friday morning. 

READ ALSO: What’s the latest on the SAS plane strike?

Marianne Hernæs, SAS’s negotiator on Friday told journalists she was tired after sitting at the negotiating table long into the night. 

“We need to find a model where we can meet in the middle and which can ensure that we pull in the income that we are dependent on,” she said. 

Klokset said that there was “a good atmosphere” in the talks, and that the unions were sticking together to represent their members.

“I think we’ve been extremely flexible so far. It’s ‘out of this world’,’ said Henrik Thyregod, with the Danish pilots’ union. 

“This could have been solved back in December if SAS had not made unreasonable demands on the pilots,” Klokset added. 

The strike, which is now in its 12th day, has cost SAS up to 130m kronor a day, with 2,550 flights cancelled by Thursday, affecting 270,000 passengers. 

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