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Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Tuesday

Michael Barrett
Michael Barrett - [email protected]
Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Tuesday
Danish Royal Guards line up ahead of the arrival of Spain's King Felipe and Queen Letizia for a state visit to Denmark on Monday. Photo: Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix

Government to present plan for welfare spending, opposition reacts to proposed tax cuts and drivers cut speed after fuel prices go up. Here are the news stories from Denmark on Tuesday morning.

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Government to announce plan for welfare spending 

Following yesterday’s announcement of a major plan to cut income taxes, the government will today set out its plans for spending on the welfare sector up to 2030, news wire Ritzau reports.

Finance Minister Nicolai Wammen will present investments in the welfare system costing up to 32 billion kroner, the minister confirmed to Ritzau.

“We will give a financial boost to welfare of an additional 32 billion kroner. That boost will be targeted at the elderly, children, health, education, safety and more,” he said.

We’ll report key details of the full announcement once it has been made today.

Vocabulary: et økonomisk løft – a financial boost/lift

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Other parties react to tax announcement

The tax proposal presented yesterday by the government includes a large sum, 500 million kroner, which is earmarked for tax cuts for which the target is yet to be decided and can be negotiated with opposition parties.

Those parties yesterday stated their initial reactions to the proposal, which offers tax cuts to all people who work in Denmark, with different measures targeting different income groups.

The libertarian party Liberal Alliance praised the plan to cut taxes in generally but its leader Alex Vanopslagh said a proposed “top-top-tax” on the very highest earners was “insensible”.

At the opposite end of the ideological scale, the left-wing Red Green Alliance criticised the structure of the proposed cuts. Lead spokesperson Pelle Dragsted argued directors would gain a lot more than shop assistants, and criticised the Social Democrats, the senior coalition partner, for what he called a “huge failure” to protect the interests of its voters.

The Danish People’s Party meanwhile said it wants pensioners – who are not included in the proposal, which only offers cuts to working people – to also be given tax cuts.

Vocabulary: forhandlingsreserve – reserve for negotiation

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Thousands of turkeys culled after bird flu discovery

The Danish Veterinary and Food Administration and emergency services have culled 32,000 turkeys after an outbreak of bird flu, the agency said in a statement.

Culling is necessary when the disease is discovered to prevent further spreading and due to animal welfare considerations. Human infection with avian flu is very rare, the Veterinary and Food Administration said.

It is “important that everyone who has birds follows the rules and takes responsibility for protecting their poultry against infection from wild birds,” head of department at the agency Mitte Kirkeskov Sie said in the statement.

Vocabulary: fugleinfluenza – avian flu

Drivers take it a little slower on Denmark’s motorways

Average speeds on motorways began to fall last year as fuel price rose, a trend that has continued in 2023 according to statistics from the Danish Road Directorate.

The average speed is now between 2 and 3 km/h slower than before fuel prices went up, according to the authority.

The trend can be seen as a positive one in terms of both road safety and envorinmental impact, project leader for traffic statistics with the Danish Road Directorate, Niels Moltved, said in comments to Ritzau.

Vocabulary: at sætte farten ned – to slow down a bit

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