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Denmark’s drought to continue this weekend but when will rain come?

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Ritzau/The Local - [email protected]
Denmark’s drought to continue this weekend but when will rain come?
Garden is watered due to drought in Lellinge near Køge, Denmark, on Tuesday June 6th, 2023. Only limited rain is currently forecast and not for another eight days. Photo: Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix

This weekend will see the extended period of dry weather continue in Denmark with some of the warmest temperatures so far this year. The wait for even a small amount of rain could go on for another week, according to forecasters.

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Thursday saw a bonfire ban introduced on the island of Bornholm, while water companies have encouraged consumers not to water lawns or use garden pools.

Dry fields are unlikely to get any relief this weekend, according to forecasts.

“The weekend will follow the same track. Not a drop of rain from above, lots of sun and between 18 and 25 degrees. So still a high risk of drought in all of Denmark,” meteorologist Anja Bodholdt of national agency DMI said.

Friday morning saw some clouds and mist in the western part of the country but that was expected to clear and be replaced by sun.

READ ALSO: Denmark likely to ban Sankt Hans bonfires due to dry weather

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An easterly wind means higher temperatures can now be found in the west of the country. West Jutland could see up to 25 degrees Celsius this weekend.

Bornholm and areas near the Baltic Sea will be cooler at 15 to 18 degrees, with moderate winds also possible.

All of Denmark remains in need of rain according to DMI’s drought index.

“Many are short of water and it’s needed in all of Denmark,” Bodholdt said.

Not a single drop of rain had fallen in the country since May 23rd, and while forecasts on Friday showed possible rain in the near future, the drought needle is unlikely to move imminently according to broadcaster DR.

Forecasts – which carry a high degree of uncertainty – suggest that Bornholm, Zealand and other islands could get between 2 and 13 millimetres of rain in 8 days’ time.

That rain will fall as showers and amounts will therefore be variable locally, DR writes, meaning it is unlikely to have much impact on the drought index – which currently stands at 9.9 out of 10.

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