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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday

Prince Joachim’s reaction to his children losing their titles, a potential MitID security weak spot, and other news stories in Denmark on Friday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday
The Danish Cancer Society says that more young people are using tanning salons and regulation is needed. File photo: Ida Guldbæk Arentsen/Ritzau Scanpix

‘No timeframe’ for fixing Nord Stream pipelines

Nord Stream’s operator said yesterday it was unable to immediately assess damage to pipelines linking Russia to Europe, threatening an indeterminate outage. That came after Sweden detected a fourth leak and NATO decried “acts of sabotage”. 

Nord Stream’s operator said it “intends to start assessing the damage to the pipeline as soon as it receives necessary official permits”, news wire AFP reports.

It said access could be allowed “only after the pressure in the gas pipeline has stabilised and the gas leakage has stopped”. 

“Until the completion of the damage assessment, it is not possible to predict the timeframe for restoration of the gas transmission infrastructure”, the operator said.

NATO declared the damage was “the result of deliberate, reckless and irresponsible acts of sabotage” and said it supported investigations to determine the origin of the damage.

READ ALSO: Could Baltic Sea gas pipe leaks affect Denmark’s election timeline?

Prince Joachim not happy after children lose titles

In a rare episode of public drama in the Danish royal family, Prince Joachim, the Queen’s second son, yesterday went to the media to express his disappointment over the decision to remove the titles of ‘prince’ and ‘princess’ from his children as of next year.

Prince Joachim’s four children will no longer be princes or princesses but will retain their other titles as Count or Countess of Monpezat, the royal palace announced on Wednesday. The decision was taken by Queen Margrethe.

“It’s never fun to see your children harmed in this way. They themselves are in a situation they don’t understand,” Prince Joachim told newspaper Ekstra Bladet.

In a longer interview with another newspaper, BT, the prince said the decision to change the children’s titles had been moved forward.

“This whole idea was take my children’s identity from them when they each reach 25 years of age… I was given five days’ warning when the decision was brought forward,” he said.

‘Simple hack’ can breach MitID, media reports

Media Version2, a supplement of engineering journal Ingeniøren, reports that a coding trick can enable hackers to easily identify the usernames of MitID users.

The MitID digital ID system is gradually replacing NemID as the online ID used in Denmark for access to public service platforms, online banking and shopping online.

READ ALSO: MitID takes over as default option on Danish platforms

The Danish Agency for Digitisation (Digitaliseringsstyrelsen) told Ingeniøren that it would investigate the issue.

NemID will be turned off for secure platforms like banking and public services on October 31st. After this date, only MitID can be used to log on.

Other platforms, like online shopping, will still accept NemID for now. The old system will be fully decommissioned on June 30th, 2023. 

Cancer charity wants to ban solariums for under-18s

The Danish Cancer Society (Kræftens Bekæmpelse) says that increasing numbers of young people are using solariums in Denmark and that regulation is therefore needed on the area.

A report from the charity finds that 16 percent of young people aged between 15 and 25 use tanning salons, an increase from 10 percent two years ago.

“This calls for us needing an age limit of 18 years for use of solariums. Because if this continues, we will have more cases of skin cancer in future,” project manager Peter Dalum told news wire Ritzau.

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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday

A Danish school evacuated due to a sickening smell, Nigeria prosecuting Danish soldiers in piracy case, and a ringing endorsement for fourth Covid-19 jabs are among the top news stories in Denmark on Friday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday

‘Unpleasant smell’ that sickened children at Danish school is unexplained 

 An Aarhus-area school was evacuated on Thursday after a mysterious smell appeared to be related to new headaches, coughs, and runny noses in students and teachers, newswire Ritzau reports. 

Suspecting some kind of chemical spill, school management reached out to emergency services — but police, the fire brigade and emergency medical responders were unable to identify the cause, according to a tweet by the East Jutland Police. 

However, authorities were able to rule out a chemical spill, police tell broadcaster TV2, and the investigation is ongoing. 

ICYMI: Recent Covid-19 booster jab offers good protection, Danish agency says 

People who received the most recent round of Covid-19 boosters are at significantly lower risk for hospitalisation, according to a recent analysis by the State Serum Institute, Denmark’s infectious disease agency. 

Having a second booster (for most, that would be your fourth dose) provides “around 75 percent better” protection against hospital admission than just three doses, writes Bolette Søborg, senior medical consultant at the SSI, on the agency’s website. 

READ ALSO: Can you get a second Covid-19 booster in Denmark if you are not in a risk group? 

Nigeria to prosecute Danish soldiers involved in piracy case 

This week, Copenhagen District Court began to hear the case against a Nigerian man authorities say is a pirate who participated in an attack on a Danish vessel off the coast of Nigeria in November 2021. 

But now, Nigeria has announced its intention to prosecute the Danish soldiers involved in the same incident, in which four Nigerian nationals were killed. 

“We demand that Denmark release the remaining Nigerian in Danish custody. We demand an apology from Denmark to Nigeria for the behavior of the frigate,” says Nicholas Ella, director of the legal department in Nigeria’s Ministry of Foreign affairs, according to newspaper Weekendavisen.  

Ella describes the firefight as the “direct murder of people on the boat,” Weekendavisen reports.

READ ALSO: 

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