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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday

Copenhagen Pride, billions raised for the Ukraine war effort, and a steamy weekend ahead are among the top news stories in Denmark on Friday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday
Svanemølle Beach is a hop, skip and a jump from the fashionable Østerbro neighborhood. Photo: Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix

Copenhagen Pride kicks off 

Copenhagen Pride begins this weekend with events across the city, from film screenings and concerts to historical walking tours and good-old-fashioned parties — here’s the full schedule of events.

You’ll have to wait until next weekend for the iconic Copenhagen pride parade. 

Donors raise 10.8 billion kroner for Ukraine 

Representatives for 26 countries convened in Copenhagen for a fundraiser for Ukraine, ultimately committing to more than 10.8 billion kroner (that’s over $1.5 billion) to support training and equipment this year and the next. 

France, Germany and the United States have yet to announce how much they contributed to the impressive total, but Denmark and the UK, the two countries behind the fundraiser, have revealed their supplemental donations were $114 million and almost $300 million, respectively. 

“Our partners know that we need funding and they articulated readiness to support us financially,” Ukrainian Defence Minister Oleksii Reznikov said, according to the Agence France-Presse 
“That is a marathon and for a marathon you need energy and frankly
speaking, the main energy in this case is money.” 

READ MORE: Denmark’s government supports EU candidacy for Ukraine 

Brace for heat 

We’re in for a steamy weekend, according to the Danish Meteorological Association. 

Forecasts predict cloudless skies Saturday and Sunday with temperatures between 25 and 30 degrees — perhaps as high as 32 on Saturday. 

If you decide to break out the grill, though, be mindful — Danish Emergency Services says the warm weather and recent lack of rain mean an elevated risk for fires this weekend. 

READ MORE: Three great open-air swimming spots in Copenhagen 

Minister of Justice calls for meeting with…football fans 

Football players and fan club leaders have been invited to meet with Danish minister of justice Mattias Tesfaye after yet another week of unrest surrounding matches, TV2 Lorry reports. 

Tesfaye says he’s willing to do what’s necessary to make the stadium environment safe for the 99 percent of fans who come for “football and partying.” Possible measures include making penalties harsher for crimes connected with games (again) and increasing police presence.

This follows several weeks of dust-ups between rival fans, fans and stadium staff, and fans and police that sent several to hospital and involved considerable destruction at various stadiums. 

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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Thursday

Shorter Master's' degrees, sanctions against Russia, and deficiencies in the Danish Armed Forces are among the top news stories in Denmark on Thursday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Thursday

Denmark plans to shorten Master’s degrees to save money 

Next week, the government will present a plan to cut costs for some Master’s degree programmes by lopping off the second and final year, newspaper Politiken reports. But both labour unions and industry representatives worry it risks turning out under-prepared graduates. 

The changes would affect half of all master’s students in Denmark, according to Politiken, and 70 percent of students in humanities and social sciences.The intent is to funnel the savings into “medium-term professional courses” including nursing, teaching, and social work.

“We are very concerned that university education will be degraded,” says Sara Vergo, chairman of the trade union Djøf, which represents students and workers in “social sciences, business and law.”  

READ MORE: How to save money as a student in Denmark

Denmark pushes for more sanctions against Russia 

Foreign minister Jeppe Kofod says he and his EU counterparts from other countries have agreed to further ramp up sanctions against Russia for its invasion of Ukraine. 

Likely targets are tightening restrictions against Russian oligarchs and imposing sanctions on Russian exports that are vital to the economy and military industry, Kofod tells newswire Ritzau. 

“These are sanctions that hit Putin’s regime and the people around him,” he added. 

The European Commission’s foreign affairs chief told Reuters that the new sanctions will be designed to target “more relevant sectors of the Russian economy and continue to target individuals responsible for the war of aggression against Ukraine.” 

The EU’s foreign ministers will convene again in mid-October to finalise the new sanctions package. 

READ MORE: 10 ways EU countries aim to cut energy bills and avoid blackouts this winter 

Tire-kicking reveals deficiencies in Danish Armed Forces 

On Wednesday, defence minister Morten Bødskov outlined the results of an investigation into the facilities and equipment of the Danish Armed Forces — and both have been found lacking. 

“We need billions of investment just to continue the current defence,” Bødskov said at a press conference. 

A correspondent for broadcaster DR wrote that the audit confirms what many in defence have reported for years — mouldy barracks and “hopelessly old IT equipment.” 

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