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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Wednesday

Lower fees for using Visa-Dankort abroad, more parents choosing private midwives, and record inflation are among the top news stories in Denmark on Wednesday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Wednesday
As of Tuesday evening, only about 18 7-Eleven convenience stores is back up and running in Denmark following what is believed to have been a cyber attack Monday. Photo: Bo Amstrup / Ritzau Scanpix

In case you missed it: here’s who is eligible for monkeypox vaccines 

Denmark will now offer monkeypox vaccinations to all men who have sex with men and have multiple sexual partners. Previously, the shots were only given to people who had been in close contact with a confirmed case.

It’s important to emphasize that anyone can get monkeypox from close contact, not just men who have sex with men.

READ MORE: Monkeypox: Denmark to offer vaccination to at-risk group

Denmark sees highest inflation since 1983 

Consumer prices have climbed 8.7 percent since July 2021, according to figures from the government agency Statistics Denmark. It’s the highest rate of inflation the country has experienced since 1983.

Skyrocketing prices for food, electricity, and fuel are driving the change to price indices, newswire Ritzau reports. 

READ MORE: Will house prices in Denmark ever fall? 

Danske Bank lowers fees for purchases abroad 

An order goes into effect Wednesday requiring Danske Bank to charge customers less when paying in foreign currencies. 

Earlier this year, the Competition Council determined both Danske Bank and Nordea added unreasonable surcharges to purchases abroad — 1.5 percent within the EU and 2 percent for the rest of the world. 

As per the Competition Council’s findings, Danske Bank must drop the currency exchange surcharge altogether within the EU and reduce the rate to 1.5 percent outside the bloc. 

Danske Bank has already appealed the decision and will argue their case before a judge at the Copenhagen District Court.

READ MORE: Danish banks raise interest rates but many remain negative 

Business booms for private midwives 

Demand for private midwives has increased steadily over the past five years as cuts to the public system have left midwives there overburdened, broadcaster DR reports

The number of parents-to-be applying for subsidies for private midwives jumped 17 percent from 2020 to 2021 alone, data from health insurance agency Sygeforsikring Danmark show. 

Parents cite a desire for more personalised attention, DR finds. In particular, new parents are eager for more frequent pre-natal scans and more help breastfeeding after baby is born. 

READ MORE: Denmark presents plan to hire 100 more staff at maternity wards 

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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday

Prince Joachim’s reaction to his children losing their titles, a potential MitID security weak spot, and other news stories in Denmark on Friday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday

‘No timeframe’ for fixing Nord Stream pipelines

Nord Stream’s operator said yesterday it was unable to immediately assess damage to pipelines linking Russia to Europe, threatening an indeterminate outage. That came after Sweden detected a fourth leak and NATO decried “acts of sabotage”. 

Nord Stream’s operator said it “intends to start assessing the damage to the pipeline as soon as it receives necessary official permits”, news wire AFP reports.

It said access could be allowed “only after the pressure in the gas pipeline has stabilised and the gas leakage has stopped”. 

“Until the completion of the damage assessment, it is not possible to predict the timeframe for restoration of the gas transmission infrastructure”, the operator said.

NATO declared the damage was “the result of deliberate, reckless and irresponsible acts of sabotage” and said it supported investigations to determine the origin of the damage.

READ ALSO: Could Baltic Sea gas pipe leaks affect Denmark’s election timeline?

Prince Joachim not happy after children lose titles

In a rare episode of public drama in the Danish royal family, Prince Joachim, the Queen’s second son, yesterday went to the media to express his disappointment over the decision to remove the titles of ‘prince’ and ‘princess’ from his children as of next year.

Prince Joachim’s four children will no longer be princes or princesses but will retain their other titles as Count or Countess of Monpezat, the royal palace announced on Wednesday. The decision was taken by Queen Margrethe.

“It’s never fun to see your children harmed in this way. They themselves are in a situation they don’t understand,” Prince Joachim told newspaper Ekstra Bladet.

In a longer interview with another newspaper, BT, the prince said the decision to change the children’s titles had been moved forward.

“This whole idea was take my children’s identity from them when they each reach 25 years of age… I was given five days’ warning when the decision was brought forward,” he said.

‘Simple hack’ can breach MitID, media reports

Media Version2, a supplement of engineering journal Ingeniøren, reports that a coding trick can enable hackers to easily identify the usernames of MitID users.

The MitID digital ID system is gradually replacing NemID as the online ID used in Denmark for access to public service platforms, online banking and shopping online.

READ ALSO: MitID takes over as default option on Danish platforms

The Danish Agency for Digitisation (Digitaliseringsstyrelsen) told Ingeniøren that it would investigate the issue.

NemID will be turned off for secure platforms like banking and public services on October 31st. After this date, only MitID can be used to log on.

Other platforms, like online shopping, will still accept NemID for now. The old system will be fully decommissioned on June 30th, 2023. 

Cancer charity wants to ban solariums for under-18s

The Danish Cancer Society (Kræftens Bekæmpelse) says that increasing numbers of young people are using solariums in Denmark and that regulation is therefore needed on the area.

A report from the charity finds that 16 percent of young people aged between 15 and 25 use tanning salons, an increase from 10 percent two years ago.

“This calls for us needing an age limit of 18 years for use of solariums. Because if this continues, we will have more cases of skin cancer in future,” project manager Peter Dalum told news wire Ritzau.

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