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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Monday

Why the US climate deal is a boon for Denmark, a plan to help first-time home buyers, and a prince and princess at your child's high school are among the top news stories in Denmark on Monday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Monday
On Friday, August 5th, ships from the Russian Northern Fleet sailed through the Great Belt, monitored closely by the Danish Defense. Photo: Tim Kildeborg Jensen/Ritzau Scanpix

Liberal party to propose tax deductions for first-time home buyers 

While the government remains skeptical, the Liberal Party (Venstre) will Monday present its plan to make home ownership more accessible in Denmark. 

Under the proposal, first-time home buyers could receive a 20 percent tax reduction on up to 50,000 kroner per year for five years, according to newspaper Berlingske. In five years, a couple could together save 500,000 kroner and get a tax benefit of 100,000 kroner. 

How the Liberal Party would fund the tax benefit, which is estimated to cost 1 billion kroner a year, remains unclear. While they count with the support of the Conservatives and the Danish People’s Party, the government opposes the plan.

READ MORE: Danish apartment sales cool to eight-year low  

Green energy sector in Denmark to see boost from US climate plan 

The United States Senate passed a $370 billion package — that’s 2.7 trillion kroner — earmarked for reducing the emission of greenhouse gases by 2030. A considerable chunk of that money could end up in Denmark, according to green energy experts, and particularly in the pockets of Danish wind energy companies. 

The USA also has its own companies that will bid,” says Kristian Jensen of business organisation Green Power Denmark. “But we can see that the Danish wind turbine manufacturers are unique in terms of having high quality and long durability of the turbines.” 

READ MORE: Danish offshore wind could help Europe ditch fossil fuels 

Danish royal students go mainstream 

After a TV2 documentary revealed a culture of bullying at elite boarding school Herlufsholm, the royal family pulled Prince Christian, 16, and Princess Isabella, 15, from their enrollments. 

At the start of the new term today, Isabella begins at Ingrid Jespersens Gymnasium in Østerbro and Christian will attend Ordrup Gymnasium in Charlottenlund, about 20 minutes’ drive north of Copenhagen. 

“What characterizes the chosen schools is that they are quite normal,” says Thomas Larsen, political editor at Radio4 and author of books on the Danish royals. “It is not a boarding school that is largely reserved for the children of the elite. And therefore I believe that the choices they have made now will be well received by the Danes.”  

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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday

Prince Joachim’s reaction to his children losing their titles, a potential MitID security weak spot, and other news stories in Denmark on Friday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday

‘No timeframe’ for fixing Nord Stream pipelines

Nord Stream’s operator said yesterday it was unable to immediately assess damage to pipelines linking Russia to Europe, threatening an indeterminate outage. That came after Sweden detected a fourth leak and NATO decried “acts of sabotage”. 

Nord Stream’s operator said it “intends to start assessing the damage to the pipeline as soon as it receives necessary official permits”, news wire AFP reports.

It said access could be allowed “only after the pressure in the gas pipeline has stabilised and the gas leakage has stopped”. 

“Until the completion of the damage assessment, it is not possible to predict the timeframe for restoration of the gas transmission infrastructure”, the operator said.

NATO declared the damage was “the result of deliberate, reckless and irresponsible acts of sabotage” and said it supported investigations to determine the origin of the damage.

READ ALSO: Could Baltic Sea gas pipe leaks affect Denmark’s election timeline?

Prince Joachim not happy after children lose titles

In a rare episode of public drama in the Danish royal family, Prince Joachim, the Queen’s second son, yesterday went to the media to express his disappointment over the decision to remove the titles of ‘prince’ and ‘princess’ from his children as of next year.

Prince Joachim’s four children will no longer be princes or princesses but will retain their other titles as Count or Countess of Monpezat, the royal palace announced on Wednesday. The decision was taken by Queen Margrethe.

“It’s never fun to see your children harmed in this way. They themselves are in a situation they don’t understand,” Prince Joachim told newspaper Ekstra Bladet.

In a longer interview with another newspaper, BT, the prince said the decision to change the children’s titles had been moved forward.

“This whole idea was take my children’s identity from them when they each reach 25 years of age… I was given five days’ warning when the decision was brought forward,” he said.

‘Simple hack’ can breach MitID, media reports

Media Version2, a supplement of engineering journal Ingeniøren, reports that a coding trick can enable hackers to easily identify the usernames of MitID users.

The MitID digital ID system is gradually replacing NemID as the online ID used in Denmark for access to public service platforms, online banking and shopping online.

READ ALSO: MitID takes over as default option on Danish platforms

The Danish Agency for Digitisation (Digitaliseringsstyrelsen) told Ingeniøren that it would investigate the issue.

NemID will be turned off for secure platforms like banking and public services on October 31st. After this date, only MitID can be used to log on.

Other platforms, like online shopping, will still accept NemID for now. The old system will be fully decommissioned on June 30th, 2023. 

Cancer charity wants to ban solariums for under-18s

The Danish Cancer Society (Kræftens Bekæmpelse) says that increasing numbers of young people are using solariums in Denmark and that regulation is therefore needed on the area.

A report from the charity finds that 16 percent of young people aged between 15 and 25 use tanning salons, an increase from 10 percent two years ago.

“This calls for us needing an age limit of 18 years for use of solariums. Because if this continues, we will have more cases of skin cancer in future,” project manager Peter Dalum told news wire Ritzau.

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