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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday

The need for foreign workers, an encouraging Covid snapshot, and incorrigible football fans are among the top news stories in Denmark on Friday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Friday
A "stampede" of Brøndby football fans sent two stadium stewards to the emergency room on August 4th, 2022. Photo: Philip Davali/Ritzau Scanpix

Labour crisis: ‘we will need many more foreigners’ 

Unmet demand for labour in both private businesses and the public sector has reached a crisis point, according to an appeal to the government to reach a broader labour agreement. 

The municipalities will need 44,000 additional employees by 2030, the National Association of Municipalities says. Meanwhile, Danish businesses could hire 38,000 new workers immediately, according to the Confederation of Danish Industry (Dansk Industri), which represents the interests of about 19,000 Danish companies. 

Lars Sandahl Sørensen, managing director of DI, firmly believes the answer to the labour shortage lies outside Danish borders. 

“We will need many more foreigners,” Sørensen told Finans. “It is not about getting cheap labour, but about getting people at all. We are in a situation where we do not have employees to carry out the things on green change that we have already decided and that we would like on health and welfare.” 

READ MORE: How can you get a work permit in Denmark if you aren’t an EU national? 

Encouraging Covid snapshot

The latest report from the State’s Serum Institute, the Danish infectious disease agency, says declining viral loads in the wastewater system suggest there’s a lower burden of infection in the country. 

Confirmed cases were down 19 percent between the week of July 11th to the week of July 18th, but since the number of PCR tests administered also decreased 15 percent that’s to be taken with a grain of salt. 

In the same period, new Covid hospital admissions fell nearly a quarter, with a significant decline in the elderly population. 

Omicron sub-variant BA.5 is still responsible for the lion’s share of Covid cases in Denmark, accounting for 92 percent of positive results in the week of July 18th. 

READ MORE: Which Covid self-tests should you buy (and avoid) in Denmark? 

Football fans send two to emergency room 

The double penalty zone authorities established around Brøndby stadium wasn’t enough to prevent more trips to the hospital. 

According to a press release from the Western Copenhagen Police, a group of Brøndby fans “stampeded” one of the stadium entrances prior to the club’s UEFA Conference League qualification match against Swiss side Basel last night. Three stadium stewards were injured, two of whom went to the emergency room. 

It’s unclear whether anyone has been charged in connection with the incident, but police are seeking additional information from anyone who may have witnessed the stampede at 7:12pm. 

Dreary weather to end summer holidays 

This weekend, the last holiday hurrah before many children return to school on Monday, won’t feel much like summer, according to the Danish Meteorological Institute. 

“There will be little or no sun and a few showers” with temperatures between 17 and 22 degrees says DMI meteorologist Mette Wagner. 

It’s a dramatic shift from Thursday, when the 30 degree weather was swept away by a strong rainstorm that dampened an Ed Sheeran concert in Copenhagen. 

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For members

TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Monday

Three million Danes 'underdosed' with original Covid vaccine, the energy company shutting down its phone lines, and a Dane at the US January 6th hearings are among the top news stories in Denmark on Monday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Monday

Three million Danes ‘underdosed’ with Covid vaccine 

An investigation by broadcaster DR has revealed that three million people vaccinated for Covid-19 in Denmark between May 2021 and May 2022 didn’t receive a full dose. 

Despite repeated warnings by the State Serum Institute, Denmark’s infectious disease agency, the Danish Health Authority instructed vaccination sites to draw an extra dose from vials of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. That means people received ten percent less than the dose approved by the European Medicines Agency, according to an experiment by the Danish Technological Institute. 

Studies as to whether people who received an underdose were more likely to catch Covid-19 or suffer serious outcomes are ongoing. 

READ MORE: Covid-19: Danish authorities ‘not concerned’ after new subvariant detected

Danish energy provider, overwhelmed by calls, closes phone lines 

If you’ve been struggling to get through to Andel Energi with a question about your bill, you’re in good company — under a deluge of calls, the company has taken to closing its phone lines when the queue becomes too long. 

“We’re geared up to answer 4,500 customers a day, but at the moment we’re getting over 2,000 calls an hour,” Rasmus Avnskjold, Andel Energi’s press officer, tells newswire Ritzau. 

The phone lines open as normal every morning, Avnskjold explains. Most callers are given the opportunity to request a ‘callback’ when a representative is available so they don’t spend hours on hold, and when that queue stretches past what Andel Energi figures they can handle in a day the line is closed. Customers are asked to call back the following day. 

The deluge of calls is due in no small part to the winter aid package passed by Parliament — it’s up to companies to administer the ‘price freeze’ scheme mandated by the government, which will allow customers to pay excess bills back over the next several years. 

READ MORE: How much will electricity tax cut save bill payers in Denmark? 

Danish documentarian will be questioned by US January 6th Committee

Denmark will have a brief cameo in the United States’ investigation of the storming of Congress on January 6th, 2021. 

Christoffer Guldbrandsen, a Danish journalist and documentarian, will share video and testify as to what happened at the Willard Hotel in D.C., where top Trump advisors gathered in the days before the attack. Guldbrandsen has followed Roger Stone, the longtime conservative political consultant and Trump advisor who was convicted of obstruction of justice in the Mueller probe, for two years. 

Guldbrandsen is set to appear before the Committee on Wednesday. 

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