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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Monday

Erratic weather, a stray narwhal, and a surge in electric car sales are among the top news stories in Denmark on Monday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Monday
Forty thousand young people are camped out at the Hedeland Nature Park for the largest scout camp in the Nordics.

‘Unsettled’ weather ahead 

It won’t be storybook weather for the last week of summer school holidays, according to the Danish Meteorological Institute. 

Monday morning’s fog and drizzle should give way to at least a little sunshine and a high of 23 degrees. 

There’s another chance of sun on Tuesday morning before the clouds return, and with them the possibility of showers. 

“On Wednesday and Thursday there is an opportunity for a breath of heat,” says DMI meteorologist Mette Wagner. Both days start with rain but temperatures could rise to 28 and 30 degrees, respectively. 

It’ll cool down again by Friday, with a high of 21. 

Should people affected by contamination in Denmark postpone pregnancy? 

In May, a report by the Danish Regions found that up to 14,607 places in Denmark are contaminated by PFAS, ‘forever chemicals’ that persist in water and soil and can cause harm to human health. 

The Danish Health Authority is now reconsidering its assessment that neither pregnancy nor breastfeeding should be postponed after exposure to PFAS, even for those exposed to the highest levels. 

PFAs are “suspected of causing liver damage, kidney damage, elevated cholesterol levels, reduced fertility, hormonal disturbances, weaker immune systems, negatively affecting fetal development and being carcinogenic,” broadcaster DR reports.

Electric vehicle sales in Denmark supercharged 

Overall car sales in Denmark are in a significant slump, down 24 percent in the first seven months of 2022 compared to 2021. But despite supply chain problems, electric vehicle sales are very much in the green. 

In July alone, 1,935 new electric cars hit the roads in Denmark, up 44.3 percent from July of 2021. They account for 20 percent of all cars sold that month. “There is therefore every reason to expect that the progress of the rechargeable car types will continue,” Jeppe Juul Borre, chief economist at Arbejdernes Landsbank, told news wire Ritzau. 

READ MORE: Six things to know about buying a used car in Denmark 

Narwhal washes ashore 

A narwhal was stranded on Danish shores in northeast Jutland over the weekend, and despite the best efforts of a local hobby fisherman and the Danish Nature agency, did not survive. 

It’s unusual to find a narwhal outside of very deep waters, so sightings in Denmark are rare. This latest find follows another narwhal stranding in January. 

The 4.5 meter cetacean will be necropsied (that’s an autopsy for an animal) to attempt to determine the cause of its stranding and eventual death. 

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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Thursday

Skyrocketing wait times for psychiatrists, splitting monkeypox vaccine doses, and the 7-Eleven ransom are among the top news stories in Denmark on Thursday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Thursday

It takes a year to see a psychiatrist in Denmark 

New data from sundhed.dk analysed by broadcaster DR show an average wait time of 63 weeks to get in with a psychiatrist. 

Wait times for mental health care have climbed dramatically over the last several years. In 2018, the average wait to see a psychiatrist was 23.6 weeks, DR reports, while in 2021, the wait was 37.4 weeks. That’s a 68 percent leap from 2021 to 2022. 

Regional differences in wait times are dramatic — in North Jutland, patients wait an average of 84 weeks. 

Minister of health Magnus Heunicke has refused to sit for an interview with DR on the status of a 10-year plan to improve access to mental healthcare. 

READ MORE: Depressed in Denmark: How to find a therapist in the ‘world’s happiest country’ 

Danish officers will train Ukrainian forces in UK 

Within the next six months, 130 Danish instructors will arrive in the United Kingdom to train Ukrainian soldiers who have “no or limited military experience,” according to newswire Ritzau. 

“We have undertaken to train up to 10,000 Ukrainian soldiers in Great Britain, and I am pleased that Denmark will participate in that project,” Ben Wallace, the British minister of defense, said at a press conference in Copenhagen Wednesday afternoon. 

Danish minister of defense Morten Bødskov says the country has also extended an offer to train Ukrainian soldiers in Denmark — for example, in de-mining. 

Russia’s ambassador to Denmark, Vladimir Barbin, sees the assistance to Ukraine as “delaying peace,” he wrote in an email to broadcaster TV2. 

Danish drugmaker objects to plan to split monkeypox doses 

Bavarian Nordic, the company behind the monkeypox vaccine, has spoken out against the US Food and Drug Administration’s plan to split single doses of the drug into five smaller doses under certain circumstances, according to reporting by the Washington Post. 

The FDA signed off on the plan on Tuesday in an effort to extend a limited supply of doses to a greater population. 

The US isn’t the first country to attempt to get creative with the dosing of the vaccine. According to Bavarian’s instructions, the monkeypox vaccine should be administered over two shots separated by at least 28 days, but the UK has begun offering only a single shot. 

If countries decide to give one shot now, they have a long time to offer the booster and still achieve the same durability advantage. There is plenty of data to support one shot,” Paul Chaplin, managing director of Bavarian Nordic, told news outlet Science in July. 

READ MORE: Danish LGBTQ+ group welcomes monkeypox vaccination decision 

7-Eleven mostly back on grid after ransomware attack

About 169 of 7-Eleven’s 176 Denmark locations are back up and running, according to a statement from the convenience store company on Wednesday evening. 

However, convenience stores at train stations (where you can buy a transport card) only accept Dankort at the moment. All operational stores outside of train stations currently accept Mobile Pay and cash, and many can take Visa, Mastercard, and Dankort. 

7-Eleven has also confirmed that the outage was due to a ransomware attack — hackers demanded money to return access to the company’s data and systems. 

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