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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Monday

Police give more details on the Copenhagen shooting, SAS negotiations could end today and cooler summer weather are among the main stories in Denmark this Monday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Monday
The first flower is laid in front of the entrance to Fields, which is closed for at least a week after Sunday's shooting. Police are still investigating the crime scene on Monday 4th July 2022. Photo by Mads Claus Rasmussen / Ritzau Scanpix

Copenhagen shooting suspect known to mental health services 

Police in Denmark have confirmed the gunman who killed three people and wounded several others in a shooting at the Field’s mall in Copenhagen on Sunday, was known to mental health services. Police said they believe he acted alone and there was no sign of terrorism.

The three killed have been identified as a Danish woman and man, both aged 17, and a 47-year-old Russian citizen residing in Denmark.

Another four were injured in the shooting: two Danish women, aged 19 and 40, and two Swedish citizens, a 50-year-old man and a 16-year-old woman.

Field’s shopping mall won’t open until at least next Monday, according to its website. Most roads have now opened, apart from the area right around Field’s and the shopping mall car park.

Trains and the metro are also running as usual to and from Ørestad Station, which is located at Field’s.

READ MORE:

LATEST: Suspect in Copenhagen shooting had history of mental health issues✎

UPDATED: What we know so far about the Copenhagen mall shooting

SAS negotiations deadline today

SAS hope to find a solution in their negotiations with the airline’s pilots about their salary and working conditions by midday today. Talks resumed on Sunday morning before the extended deadline of midday on Monday. If an agreement can’t be reached, it could mean that up to a thousand pilots will go on strike.

The pilots are employed by SAS’s parent company, SAS Scandinavia, and have announced strike action because they are not satisfied with their salary and working conditions at SAS.

In addition, the pilots are dissatisfied with the fact that instead of re-employing old SAS pilots, priority is given to hiring new pilots on cheaper agreements in the two subsidiaries SAS Link and SAS Connect.

On Saturday morning, when the parties stated that they would continue the negotiations up until and including Monday at 12 noon, there was hope of being able to land an agreement.

People in Denmark can save millions of litres of petrol with more bike rides

People living in Denmark are known for their love of cycling but it is hoped the Tour de France will encourage even more people to choose their bike over their car.

Calculations from DI Transport show that if people in Denmark started cycling 10 percent more instead of using the car, then 7.7 million litres of petrol and 4.8 million litres of diesel could be saved each year.

“If you replace the car with the bike, it is just a win-win on all fronts. You save petrol costs and get more exercise, and at the same time you help the climate and reduce congestion on the roads”, Karsten Lauritzen, industry director at DI Transport said.

Cool summer weather coming Denmark’s way

Although Monday starts with sunshine, it will quickly turn to cloud with some rain, according to the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI).

Monday’s temperatures will vary between 17 and 20 degrees. It’s a similar picture for the rest of the week, with DMI forecasting cooler temperatures and showers. Thursday is predicted to be the warmest day of the week, where temperatures may reach over 20 degrees but with some rain.

“It is not exactly the best beach weather if you are on a west-facing coast”, according to Bolette Brødsgaard from DMI, due to the strong westerly winds from Wednesday onwards. However she adds that “every day it will be possible to get something good out of the weather – it is after all summer. It’s just a matter of finding a shelter or keeping an eye on the radar when it rains.”

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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Wednesday

Lower fees for using Visa-Dankort abroad, more parents choosing private midwives, and record inflation are among the top news stories in Denmark on Wednesday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Wednesday

In case you missed it: here’s who is eligible for monkeypox vaccines 

Denmark will now offer monkeypox vaccinations to all men who have sex with men and have multiple sexual partners. Previously, the shots were only given to people who had been in close contact with a confirmed case.

It’s important to emphasize that anyone can get monkeypox from close contact, not just men who have sex with men.

READ MORE: Monkeypox: Denmark to offer vaccination to at-risk group

Denmark sees highest inflation since 1983 

Consumer prices have climbed 8.7 percent since July 2021, according to figures from the government agency Statistics Denmark. It’s the highest rate of inflation the country has experienced since 1983.

Skyrocketing prices for food, electricity, and fuel are driving the change to price indices, newswire Ritzau reports. 

READ MORE: Will house prices in Denmark ever fall? 

Danske Bank lowers fees for purchases abroad 

An order goes into effect Wednesday requiring Danske Bank to charge customers less when paying in foreign currencies. 

Earlier this year, the Competition Council determined both Danske Bank and Nordea added unreasonable surcharges to purchases abroad — 1.5 percent within the EU and 2 percent for the rest of the world. 

As per the Competition Council’s findings, Danske Bank must drop the currency exchange surcharge altogether within the EU and reduce the rate to 1.5 percent outside the bloc. 

Danske Bank has already appealed the decision and will argue their case before a judge at the Copenhagen District Court.

READ MORE: Danish banks raise interest rates but many remain negative 

Business booms for private midwives 

Demand for private midwives has increased steadily over the past five years as cuts to the public system have left midwives there overburdened, broadcaster DR reports

The number of parents-to-be applying for subsidies for private midwives jumped 17 percent from 2020 to 2021 alone, data from health insurance agency Sygeforsikring Danmark show. 

Parents cite a desire for more personalised attention, DR finds. In particular, new parents are eager for more frequent pre-natal scans and more help breastfeeding after baby is born. 

READ MORE: Denmark presents plan to hire 100 more staff at maternity wards 

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