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Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Wednesday

Wind turbines near the Avedøre power plant outside Copenhagen.
Wind turbines near the Avedøre power plant outside Copenhagen. File photo: Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix
Find out what's going on in Denmark today with The Local's short roundup of the news in less than five minutes.

Minister says no plans to delay return to schools 

Schools are scheduled to return from the Christmas break on January 5th, having switched to online classes just before the end of the autumn term in response to soaring Covid-19 infection rates.

That plan will not be changed despite continued high infection numbers during the Christmas holidays, schools minister Pernille Rosenkrantz-Theil told newspaper Jyllands-Posten yesterday.

“So far, infection numbers, hospitalisations and vaccination rates have not deviated from what we projected before Christmas,” Rosenkrantz-Theil said.

The minister did however not that there were no “set in stone” guarantees on whether the plan could be changed.

Nurses switch to private sector in search of better conditions

A shortage of nurses in the Danish hospital is not being alleviated by an increasing number of the health sector workers switching to private sector jobs, broadcaster DR writes.

The proportion of nurses working in the private sector has increased every year since 2013, according to the report.

A nurse who spoke to DR said she “now received a wage that matches my qualifications” after making the switch.

A survey by the Danish nurses’ union, DSR, last summer found that 3,400 nurses’ jobs were vacant at hospitals across the country. The 2022 budget contained an emergency one-off injection for the health system, intended in part to prevent staff from leaving the service.

READ ALSO: EXPLAINED: Why has the government intervened in Denmark’s nurses strike?

World’s biggest windmill starts turning

The tallest wind turbine in the world – 271.4 metres from top to toe – has begun to spin following installation at the test centre for large windmills and Østerild near Thy in northwestern Jutland.

The structure, built by turbine maker Siemens Gamesa, can produce enough power for 18,000 households, according to DR.

Its remarkable stature could however be overshadowed by a competitor as soon as next year.

Unemployment falls amongst university graduates

Amid high employment and a labour shortage on the jobs market generally, the number of out of work people with university backgrounds has dropped significantly, DR writes.

The last year has seen the number of academics – persons with a university or equivalent education – fall from 30,008 in October 2020 to 21,070 in October 2021.

The broadcaster spoke to a business leader to ask their tips for how to attract academics to jobs, such is the demand to fill vacant positions.


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