How many ‘breakthrough’ Covid-19 infections are there in Denmark?

Covid-19 rapid antigen tests in Denmark. The number of vaccinated people who have later tested positive for Covid-19 is under 1 percent.
Covid-19 rapid antigen tests in Denmark. The number of vaccinated people who have later tested positive for Covid-19 is under 1 percent. Photo: Philip Davali/Ritzau Scanpix
The proportion of people in Denmark who have tested positive for Covid-19 after vaccination against the virus is under 1 percent.

The total of 38,587 breakthrough infections, released on Friday by the national infectious disease agency State Serum Institute (SSI), covers the period up to the end of last week and gives a proportion of 0.93 percent of vaccinated persons who have subsequently tested positive for the virus.

Official figures on Friday show that 4,425,979 people have been fully vaccinated against Covid-19 in Denmark.

A prior report, which did not cover the most recent two weeks included in the new report, showed the proportion to be lower at 0.5 percent.

“This naturally reflects that most people have accepted the offer of a vaccine but that we are also seeing increasing infection rates as the epidemic grows,” SSI head of department Palle Valentiner-Branth said in a statement.

“The increasing number of infections after vaccination can also be a sign that the effectiveness of vaccines declines over time in some sections of the population,” he added.

A very low number of people who have received booster vaccinations have subsequently been infected, SSI also said. The proportion in that category is under 0.1 percent.

That is a “particularly low” number, Valentiner-Branth said.

“This is despite infections having been high in the last month and that the group of revaccinated people is highly comprised of older and vulnerable people,” he said.

“That suggests revaccination gives good protection against the virus,” he added.

Even for those who do test positive for Covid-19 after vaccination, the vaccine is still important because it protects against serious symptoms and reduces the likelihood of hospitalisation with the virus, he noted.

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