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Today in Denmark: A round-up of the latest news on Friday

Today in Denmark: A round-up of the latest news on Friday
Lego's new 'Everyone is Awesome' set. Photo: Handout/Reuters/Ritzau Scanpix
Find out what's going on in Denmark today with The Local's short roundup of the news in less than five minutes.

New rules take effect as coronavirus restrictions ease 

Covid-19 restrictions take a new, more lenient form today, as per an agreement announced by the government earlier this week.

The changes allow all sports and cultural facilities yet to open under the previous plan to lift restrictions to return to business. These include the likes of saunas and baths. Education including universities will also fully reopen.

Businesses and education will essentially open fully from today, with the exception of nightclubs and discotheques. Inside areas of attractions like theme parks and zoos (and attractions that are entirely inside, like aquariums) can also reopen. Corona passport and face mask rules remain in place.

The public assembly limit meanwhile increases today from 25 to 50 persons indoors and from 75 to 100 persons outdoors.

READ ALSO: Denmark’s new reopening plan: Here’s what changes on May 21st

Frederiksberg in danger of local lockdown

Although restrictions are easing, Denmark has begun to see a mild rise in coronavirus infections nationally this week. Experts have said this is to be expected given that the reopening process, allowing more people to meet and opening more of society, has been ongoing for some time now.

Frederiksberg, an area within Copenhagen but a separate municipality, is close to the threshold for local lockdown, broadcaster DR reports this morning. The municipality currently has an incidence of 216 cases per 100,000 residents.

READ ALSO: Why is Denmark easing restrictions with Covid-19 infections on mild rise?

Plan for new ‘expulsion centre’ reignites debate over treatment of unwanted foreigners

The government’s plan to open a new expulsion centre on Langeland for foreign nationals with criminal records, announced earlier this week, faced significant pushback from local residents on the island yesterday, as well as from parliament.

Immigration minister Mattias Tesfaye is set to discuss the plan with other parties next week, with the government looking likely to struggle to get majority backing for the plan.

We spoke to two experts about Denmark’s expulsion centres and what the new plan could mean for people who live in them.

Lego celebrates diversity with rainbow-coloured figurines

Danish toy brick maker Lego unveiled a new set of rainbow-coloured figurines on Thursday to celebrate the diversity of its fans and the LGBTQI+ community.

The “Everyone is Awesome” set features 11 monochrome mini figures, each with its own individual hairstyle and rainbow colour.

“I wanted to create a model that symbolises inclusivity and celebrates everyone, no matter how they identify or who they love,” set designer Matthew Ashton said in a statement reported by news wire AFP.

US no longer wants to buy Greenland, Secretary of State confirms

The United States wants to strengthen its relationship with Greenland, especially commercially, US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said Thursday, but stressed that the country’s government, unlike Donald Trump, doesn’t want to buy it. 

Blinken visited the Danish autonomous territory as he ended a four-day trip that included a meeting of the foreign ministers of countries bordering the Artic in Reykjavik.

“I am in Greenland because the United States deeply values our partnership and wants to make it even stronger,” Antony Blinken told reporters including AFP on his final stop of the Arctic tour.

READ ALSO: Danish Arctic military boost welcomed by US Secretary of State


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