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Today in Denmark: A round-up of the latest news on Friday

Find out what's going on in Denmark today with The Local's short round-up of the news in less than five minutes.

Today in Denmark: A round-up of the latest news on Friday
A penguin at Odense Zoo on Thursday. Photo: Michael Bager/Jysk Fynske Medier/Ritzau Scanpix

Temperatures to plummet with plenty of snow forecast in coming weeks

A prognosis published by meteorological institute DMI suggests we could be in for a very cold February.

Cold winds from northern Scandinavia and Eastern Europe could push temperatures as low as 15 degrees below zero in coming weeks. Snow is also expected to fall again, so white landscapes seen across Denmark this week could stay around for a while.

High coronavirus alert level retained

Despite low current infection rates, authorities are retaining the current ‘level 5’ risk assessment level for coronavirus in all five of Denmark’s healthcare administrative regions.

“The continued growth of (more infectious variant) B117 and uncertainty about its development and effect on overall infection rates speaks in favour of retaining risk level 5,” a health authority note states according to news wire Ritzau.

The scale is used as an assessment of the level of strain on health authorities and prevalence of the virus throughout society. 5 is the highest level, 1 the lowest.

Start of 2021 sees highest number of bankrupt businesses in a decade

Although 2020 saw a low number of Danish companies go out of business despite the coronavirus pandemic, that trend has not continued into 2021, according to Ritzau.

225 companies filed for bankruptcy in January, a 20 percent increase compared to December and the highest number for January since 2010.

Last year, the total number of bankruptcies was the lowest since 2015.

Compensation packages given to business hit by the pandemic may have warded off some bankruptcies initially, but the impact may now be becoming more apparent, an analyst told the news agency.

Copenhagen Municipality green-lights construction on nature reserve

A part of the Amager Fælled nature area has lost its reserve status and can now be sold to investors, after a majority in the city’s municipal council voted in favour of development on Thursday.

The 219,000 square-kilometre area, known as Lærkesletten, can be sold to developers who wish to build homes on the land, broadcaster TV2 reports.

The sale raises money needed by the city to pay for the new Metro lines, which opened last year, and was part of a political deal agreed in 2017.

City councillors from the Social Democrats, Social Liberals, Liberals, Conservatives, Danish People’s Party and two independents voted in favour, while Red-Green Alliance, Alternative and Independent Green parties and one independent opposed.

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TODAY IN DENMARK

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Monday

Three million Danes 'underdosed' with original Covid vaccine, the energy company shutting down its phone lines, and a Dane at the US January 6th hearings are among the top news stories in Denmark on Monday.

Today in Denmark: A roundup of the news on Monday

Three million Danes ‘underdosed’ with Covid vaccine 

An investigation by broadcaster DR has revealed that three million people vaccinated for Covid-19 in Denmark between May 2021 and May 2022 didn’t receive a full dose. 

Despite repeated warnings by the State Serum Institute, Denmark’s infectious disease agency, the Danish Health Authority instructed vaccination sites to draw an extra dose from vials of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. That means people received ten percent less than the dose approved by the European Medicines Agency, according to an experiment by the Danish Technological Institute. 

Studies as to whether people who received an underdose were more likely to catch Covid-19 or suffer serious outcomes are ongoing. 

READ MORE: Covid-19: Danish authorities ‘not concerned’ after new subvariant detected

Danish energy provider, overwhelmed by calls, closes phone lines 

If you’ve been struggling to get through to Andel Energi with a question about your bill, you’re in good company — under a deluge of calls, the company has taken to closing its phone lines when the queue becomes too long. 

“We’re geared up to answer 4,500 customers a day, but at the moment we’re getting over 2,000 calls an hour,” Rasmus Avnskjold, Andel Energi’s press officer, tells newswire Ritzau. 

The phone lines open as normal every morning, Avnskjold explains. Most callers are given the opportunity to request a ‘callback’ when a representative is available so they don’t spend hours on hold, and when that queue stretches past what Andel Energi figures they can handle in a day the line is closed. Customers are asked to call back the following day. 

The deluge of calls is due in no small part to the winter aid package passed by Parliament — it’s up to companies to administer the ‘price freeze’ scheme mandated by the government, which will allow customers to pay excess bills back over the next several years. 

READ MORE: How much will electricity tax cut save bill payers in Denmark? 

Danish documentarian will be questioned by US January 6th Committee

Denmark will have a brief cameo in the United States’ investigation of the storming of Congress on January 6th, 2021. 

Christoffer Guldbrandsen, a Danish journalist and documentarian, will share video and testify as to what happened at the Willard Hotel in D.C., where top Trump advisors gathered in the days before the attack. Guldbrandsen has followed Roger Stone, the longtime conservative political consultant and Trump advisor who was convicted of obstruction of justice in the Mueller probe, for two years. 

Guldbrandsen is set to appear before the Committee on Wednesday. 

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