Museums, high schools and borders: Denmark’s next reopening plans announced

Danish political parties agreed on Wednesday to bring forward their reopening plans after lengthy negotiations which began around midday and ended shortly before midnight. Here's a look at the new reopening schedule.

Reopening straight away: Cultural institutions

Museums, theatres, art galleries, cinemas, aquariums, zoos and botanical gardens are allowed to reopen immediately, the government announced on Wednesday. 

“We are working at high pressure to give our visitors in the garden and in the museums a good and safe experience.  It takes time, but we will not compromise safety”, said Peter C. Kjærgaard, who is the director of the Natural History Museum, in a press release.

Monday May 25th: Borders

The Danish border will continue to be temporarily closed, but the parties agree to extend the list of so-called “recognised purposes for entry into Denmark” from Monday. 

This means that people with permanent residence in the other Nordic countries and Germany can travel into the country if they are, for example, holiday home owners or have a Danish girlfriend, fiancé or grandparent. In addition, business people are also allowed to travel in and out of the country. 

The Danish government is currently in dialogue with neighbouring countries in relation to opening borders. 

It has now said it will present a plan by May 29th, on “a controlled and gradual reopening of the summer house tourism, which is health-sound and which provides the tourism industry with clarity.”

Wednesday May 27th: High schools and other education

From May 27th, high schools, adult education and language centres can reopen. This means the oldest school children, from ages 16 to 19, can return to school before the summer holiday.

Evening, music and cultural schools, scouts, as well as outdoor amusement parks and summer activities for children and young people can also reopen.

Wednesday 27th: Three regions allowed to reopen the public sector 

The regions of North Jutland, Central Jutland and Southern Denmark, will be allowed to reopen the public sector from Wednesday 27th. However, this does not apply to employees in the Capital region and Zealand, where there is a greater infection risk than in the other three regions. 

Gatherings of less than ten to gradually increase but not immediately

Gathering restrictions will be raised to 30-50 from June 8th, in line with phase three of reopening. 

At the same time, the government will present a plan that includes recommendations for wedding parties, confirmation parties and other large family parties.

The gathering restrictions are expected to be raised further from July and August, reaching 500 by the end of the summer.

But so far the restriction on gatherings of less than ten is still in place, Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen emphasised.

Still close: Nightlubs, leisure facilities and indoor sports

There are still more sections of society that need to remain closed for a while. 

This applies to indoor sports, entertainment venues, night life and some sports and leisure facilities. This will be reviewed at a later date.

Statens Serum Institut released a report on Wednesday that described the risks of reopening places like night clubs where there are large gatherings.

 


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