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Social Democrats criticise Danish government for 'lack of welfare' in new budget

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Social Democrats criticise Danish government for 'lack of welfare' in new budget
Finance Minister Kristian Jensen presents the new budget proposal. Photo: Mads Claus Rasmussen/Scanpix
17:30 CEST+02:00
Denmark's opposition Social Democrats have said that the new fiscal plan presented by the government on Thursday does not do enough for the country's social welfare system.

Details of tax cuts in the proposed budget were released by the government earlier this week, and the full budget proposal was published on the government's website on Thursday.

A restructuring of Denmark's tax authority is financed by the budget, and 2.5 billion kroner is designated to be spent on the country's military, police and prison service.

State-owned rail operator DSB will lose 207 million kroner of funding, with cuts increasing to 829 million kroner by 2021.

The budget must now be passed by parliament, with negotiations set to take place in the coming weeks.

Political spokesperson Nicolai Wammen of the opposition Social Democrats told news agency Ritzau that the budget had too little focus on welfare.

“We want to ensure first and foremost that our welfare will not suffer. There must be time to take care of our elderly and god schools for our children and enough staf to take care of our sick,” Wammen told Ritzau in a written response.

60 million kroner has also been budgeted by the government to tackle gang crime, a response to a series of organised crime-linked shooting incidents in Copenhagen and Aarhus over the summer.

“If we are to ensure safety for all, we need more police. We think that is an important priority for next year's budget,” he said.

Finance Minister Kristian Jensen said in the government release of the budget that welfare and tax reductions were not mutually exclusive.

Denmark's BNP is set to by two percent for the first time since 2006, according to Ritzau. 

READ ALSO: Foreigners can help to pay for tax reform: Danish finance minister

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