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Copenhagen tourists conned by fake officers

An unknown number of foreign tourists in Copenhagen have been swindled out of around 45,000 kroner by two Romanians posing as police officers.

Copenhagen tourists conned by fake officers
Photo: Colourbox
Two Romanian men, aged 36 and 52, appeared in court on Sunday on charges that they had conned foreign tourists into paying fines for alleged criminal offences while posing as police officers, a Copenhagen Police spokesman told Ritzau news agency. 
 
According to police, the two men posed as plain-clothes officers and used a phony or foreign police sign to convince tourists that they had violated a law and needed to pay a cash fee. In other variants of the trick, the men demanded that tourists show their passports and cash and then simply disappeared with the money or conned the tourists into handing over the credit cards and PIN codes. 
 
“Many tourists don’t know the rules here in the country and these type of criminals take advantage of that,” Sajja Haider from the Copenhagen Police said. 
 
The two men were arrested on Saturday outside of one of the city’s most-frequented tourist spots, the Tivoli Gardens amusement park. They were recognized by a nearby hotel receptionist and Haider said that police have good photos of the false officers from surveillance cameras and have had many tourists give reports that point to the same two men. 
 
When they were apprehended by real police officers, the two false ones had a large amount of cash in various currencies amounting to roughly 45,000 kroner (6,000 euro, $6,600). 
 
The two Romanians are charged with fraud and impersonating a public official and face punishment of up to 18 months in prison. 

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CRIME

Former head of Danish intelligence charged over leaks

Danish prosecutors on Friday charged the country's former military intelligence chief with leaking state secrets, following a scandal over Denmark's cooperation with US intelligence.

Former head of Danish intelligence charged over leaks
The prosecution authority said Lars Findsen was accused of “having divulged secrets important to national security on several occasions and… under particularly aggravated circumstances”.
 
The details of the investigation are classified, but the case comes after Danish media reported that the Danish intelligence services had cooperated with the US National Security Agency (NSA).
 

Findsen, who was suspended in August 2020 without public explanation, was subsequently held in custody from December 2021 to February 2022. He insists he is innocent.

 
“I never divulged any state secrets. I reject the allegations”, he told Danish news agency Ritzau in June, criticising the handling of the case as “ridiculous”.
 

Prosecutors accuse Findsen of leaking state secrets and other confidential information after his suspension to six people, including two journalists, over a period of up to 17 months.

 
The leaks could “harm relations with other intelligence service partners and make their work more difficult if their work methods were revealed”, prosecutor Jakob Berger Nielsen said.
 
“Trust in the (Danish) intelligence service’s ability to protect sensitive information may have been weakened,” he added.
 
The prosecution said it would request a trial behind closed doors. A date has yet to be set.
 
While Denmark never publicly revealed why Findsen and the other agents were suspended, there have been suspicions that his service conducted illegal surveillance.
 
The government accused them of hiding “crucial information” and providing “false information to the authorities” between 2014 and 2020.
 
In May 2021, an investigation by several Danish media revealed that the NSA used Danish underwater cables to spy on officials in France, Germany, Norway and Sweden until at least 2014.
 
Former German chancellor Angela Merkel was among the NSA’s targets.
 
The revelations sparked an international scandal and the four countries demanded explanations from Washington and Copenhagen.
 
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