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Danes will have fewer public holidays in 2015

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Danes will have fewer public holidays in 2015
Here are the days you'll have off in 2015 - how you spend them is up to you. Photo: Kenny Louie/Flickr
11:15 CET+01:00
Even though many workers in Denmark are extending their Christmas holiday through the New Year, it’s never too early to look ahead to the next day off.
The public holiday schedule for 2015 works out to ten days off in addition to employees’ allotment of vacation time. But because Labour Day will double up with Great Prayer Day and the Christmas 2015 holiday includes a Saturday, there will be two fewer holidays in 2015 than 2014. 
 
It could be worse though, as 2015 will still include more time away from work than both 2010 and 2011 when the Christmas and New Year’s holidays were on weekends. 
 
 
Grab your calendars and start making your getaway plans now. Here is the official list of holidays for Denmark in 2015. 
  • Thursday, January 1st: New Year’s Day (Nytårsdag)
  • Thursday, April 2nd: Maundy Thursday (Skærtorsdag)
  • Friday, April 3rd: Good Friday (Langfredag)
  • Monday, April 6th: The day after Easter (2. påskedag)
  • Friday, May 1st: Labour Day and Great Prayer Day (Store Bededag). Note that Labour Day is not an official holiday for all employees, although many are given the day off. Because it falls on the same day as Great Prayer Day this year, all workers can stay home. 
  • Thursday, May 14th: Ascension Day (Kristi Himmelfarts dag)
  • Monday, May 25th: Whit Monday (2. pinsedag)
  • Friday, June 5th: Constitution Day (Grundlovsdag). Similar to Labour Day, this is a day that only some employees are given off. 
  • Thursday, December 24th: Christmas Eve (Juleaftensdag)
  • Friday, December 25th: Christmas (1. Juledag)
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