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EBOLA

Ebola scare closes CPH police station

A false ebola alarm temporarily closed down the Copenhagen Police’s Station City on Tuesday evening.

Ebola scare closes CPH police station
Police temporarily closed the doors to Station City before the ebola scare turned out to be a false alarm. Photo: Christian Liliendahl/Scanpix
Police say that an African man who had recently been in Nigeria was brought into Station City and displayed symptoms “that the police couldn’t rule out” were consistent with ebola, according to a police press release. 
 
The man in question was quickly isolated and a doctor was called to the police station. After the doctor quickly determined that it was not ebola, things went back to normal. 
 
“It shows the awareness of our colleagues and the reaction was completely right. We are of course happy that it wasn’t ebola and are also pleased with the caution we demonstrate when dealing with people we come into contact with,” police spokesman Jens Jespersen said. 
 
The temporary scare in Copenhagen came on the same day that a UN worker died from ebola in neighbouring Germany
 
The police station incident was the second false alarm in as many weeks, following the temporary isolation of a patient at Hvidore Hospital
 
Health officials continue to stress that the chances of an ebola outbreak in Denmark are minimal. 

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EBOLA

Ebola tests sold to Denmark recalled

The US Food and Drug Administration said that Ebola kits sent to Denmark and other countries could result in "life-threatening" false positives.

Ebola tests sold to Denmark recalled
Photo: Colourbox
US regulators have issued an international recall for a 10-minute Ebola blood test made by a California-based company, saying it has not been proven to work and could put lives at risk.
 
"A recall has been issued for the LuSys Laboratories, Inc., Ebola Virus One-Step Test Kits because the FDA has not cleared or approved the kits for use or sale," said the Food and Drug Administration in a statement emailed to reporters on Thursday.
 
"The results obtained from these test kits have not demonstrated to be accurate and should not be used as in vitro diagnostic tests for Ebola infection."
 
The recall was initially issued in mid-March and applies to test kits exported to Denmark, Sierra Leone and Canada between October 2014 and January 2015.
 
The FDA did not say how many tests were sent out.
 
The recall is described as a Class I, "the most serious type of recall and involve(s) situations in which there is a reasonable probability that use of these products will cause serious adverse health consequences or death," the FDA said.
 
"A false positive result may be life-threatening by potentially placing the patient in an isolation cohort with Ebola-infected patients."
 
Contacted by AFP, a company representative in San Diego said early trials have shown the test to be 86 percent accurate.
 
The problem with the FDA came down to a labeling error, he said. The equipment had not been properly labeled "for research purposes only."
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